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Gameplay

Sound
  Graphics

Value
Genre: Puzzle & Trivia
Min OS X: 10.2    CPU: Any CPU @ 500 MHz    RAM: 128 MB


Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters
August 22, 2007 | Kirk Hiner
Pages:12Gallery


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That's pretty much it. There are other game modes, of course. In Lucky 10 you take 10 quick clues by rolling your mouse over the spaces marked "10" in the puzzle. If you know the clue, you solve it. If not, find another. Answer all 10 correctly, and you win. There's also Lucky Players, in which up to four people can play a Lucky Letters style game. Unfortunately, they all have to be huddled over the same keyboard; there's no online multiplayer component in Lucky Letters. A clue is given, and the first player to buzz in can try to answer it. If he misses the clue, the next person who buzzed in gets a chance, if anyone else did. The player with the most money at the end wins.

Graphics
I'm not sure if the graphics are worth discussing. With games such as Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters, it's like considering the music at a Hannah Montana concert...it's all academic, and not really that important to what's really going on. The colors are bright, and there's plenty of flashing. What else do you need to know?

Actually, I do want to point out that they incorporated Pat Sajak the way they should have...which is hardly at all (no offense, Mr. Sajak). Blurry long shots of Pat appear on the opening screens, and his face occasionally appears in a small window at the bottom of the screen. In other words, there's no video. With games such as Jeopardy and Wheel of Fortune, we were forced to watch videos of Alex Trebek and Vanna White, respectively, meaning we had to endure load times that severely broke up the flow of the game and comments that were disjointed from the action. Not so, here. When Pat offers some praise or a joke at your expense, the quips are well timed because there's no unnecessary video to slow them down. This, then leads me to...

Sound
It's what you'd expect and want it to be. Plenty of beeping and blooping, some dings, and Pat Sajak. It all blends in quite nicely with the game, making it feel like an actual television game show. The music is typical, in that it's there but completely inoffensive. It blends into the background, serving more as atmosphere than anything else. You can tell the people designing this game have some experience recreating the look and feel of a game show. And although the audio options are limited, you do get the choice to turn off Pat, if you desire.

Value
At $19.99, games in this genre have to be pretty bad to not be worth the price tag. The audience is built in, as those who love word puzzles will gormandize a game like this. So, it's just a matter of catering to the crowd, and at this, Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters is successful. With three game modes, over 30,000 clues to solve, and...well...the always affable Pat Sajak, fans of game shows and word puzzles will certainly get their money's worth.

Conclusion
I think it's safe to assume that if you're the type more drawn to Prey, then you're not still reading this review. Good, because this isn't aimed at you. This review (and this game) are for fans of titles such as Infinite Crosswords and Word Web Deluxe. If you're one of those people, you should enjoy Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters. It's easy enough to get you started with a couple rounds, but challenging enough to make you want to beat the later rounds. You won't get that trip to Fiji if you do, but there will be a sense of accomplishment, and perhaps an increased vocabulary to boot.

Pros
• Well developed
• Challenging puzzles
• Multiple gameplay modes
• Pat Sajak

Cons
• No online multiplayer
• Routine graphics



Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters
Download Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters Demo
Buy Pat Sajak's Lucky Letters now at MacGameStore.com


Pages:12Gallery




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