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Gameplay

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Publisher: Aspyr Media    Genre: Action
Min OS X: 10.2.6    CPU: G4 @ 733 MHz    RAM: 256 MB    Graphics: 32 MB VRAM


X2: Wolverine’s Revenge
December 5, 2003 | Ken Newquist
Pages:12


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Graphics
Visually, the game looks solid. Wolverine is well modeled, as are each of his boss opponents. The thugs don't look quite as good, but they don't last long, so that's no big loss. The environments are well done, and the game seems to have shed the clipping issues that appeared in the console versions of the game. The most incongruous aspect of the game are the explosions, which appear photo-realistic, and clash with the game's overall look. It's not a big thing, but noticeable.

By default, Wolverine wears a costume similar to the one that he wore in X2, but scattered throughout the game are comic book covers depicting the first appearances of his various costumes. Once a comic book is found (and the level in which it was found is completed), players can choose to equip the depicted costume. As a long-time X-Men fan, I really enjoyed having Wolverine go to war wearing his classic brown-and-tan uniform.

Sound
The game has got a solid, cinematic soundtrack that's reminiscent of the movies. It nicely complements game play, although it can get a little tired later on in the game.

The voice acting is the game’s audio high point. Although he appears on the box cover, Hugh Jackman doesn't voice Wolverine. Instead, those duties fall to Mark Hamill, who does a surprisingly good job impersonating the mutant's gruff persona. Or perhaps is it not that surprising, given his extensive voice acting experience as the Joker on Batman: The Animated Series, and Hobgoblin on The Amazing Spider-man.

Patrick Stewart resumes his role as Professor Xavier from the movies and does his usual competent job, offering telepathic commentary and suggestions at various points in the game. The rest of the sound in the game isn't particularly memorable. As they are in so many other aspects, the grunting vocalizations are generic and repetitive, but again, given Wolverine's propensity for shredding his opponents, this isn't a deal breaker.

Value
Wolverine's Revenge offers a fair amount of replay value. Finding all the comic book covers takes multiple passes through the various levels, and there are special challenges that can be unlocked by completing the game. There are also dog tags, which are awarded for completing particularly impressive moves and which allow Wolverine to power-up his abilities. Mastering the strikes that earn dog tags takes practice and provides additional inspiration for retrying levels. That said, it's probably only diehard X-Men fans that would want to run through the game multiple times to unlock all these goodies.

In terms of its overall value, the game costs $40, which is $20 more than its console equivalent. X-Men fans who happen to have a game controller, and who can't fathom gaming on anything other than their Macs might want to pick it up. Those who are more casual gamers, and who have access to a PS2, Xbox or GameCube, should save the $20 and buy the console version instead. That's obviously the environment the game was designed for, and ultimately, that's the version that yields the best value.



X2: Wolverine’s Revenge
Publisher: Aspyr Media
Buy X2: Wolverine’s Revenge now at MacGameStore.com


Pages:12




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