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Thursday, October 15, 2009



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Fatale Now Available
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | 8 comments

Tale of Tales, developer of the unique The Path horror adventure title, recently announced the release of Fatale. The game is described as an interactive vignette in realtime 3D and is based on the character of Salome, daughter of Herodias, who at her mother's urging called for the beheading of John the Baptist. Tale of Tale's interpretation is inspired by Oscar Wilde's play, Salome.

Explore a living tableau filled with references to the legendary tale and enjoy the moonlit serenity of a fatal night in the orient. Fatale offers an experimental play experience that stimulates the imagination and encourages multiple interpretations and personal associations.

Fatale is played through first person 3D navigation but its controls were designed to minimize the risk of motion sickness. As a result, it may appear somewhat unconventional to the seasoned gamer.

Salome is a first century Judean princess mentioned in the Christian Bible by Matthew and by Mark. But it is Oscar Wilde's 19th century play “Salome” that really inspired Fatale. In the Bible, Salome is a child who dances for King Herod and asks the head of John the Baptist as a reward. In Wilde's version, Salome falls in love with the prophet. He rejects her and she has him executed. The play ends with her kissing the lips of his decapitated head.

Most of Fatale takes place in the aftermath of this event, when all has turned quiet and the moon brings comfort to troubled hearts.
Requirements:
  • Intel processor only
  • Recent Radeon or GeForce video card (Mac Pro, MacBook Pro, iMac, MacBook)
  • 240 MB of hard disk space
Fatale costs $7. For more information follow the links below.

Tale Of Tales
Fatale



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Apple Games Features X3: Terran Conflict
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | Comment on this story

Apple Games has posted a new article about Egosoft's X3: Terran Conflict, recently brought to Mac by Virtual Programming. The final chapter in the X3 saga continues the story of human, alien, and machine interaction with a story that includes exploration of the once isolated Earth solar system. Apple's article includes commentary from Egosoft's Bernd Lehahn and a list of websites filled with information about the game and its history.

As you complete Terran Conflict’s intersecting storylines, you unlock more characters who offer new challenges, allowing you to see the X Universe through the eyes of other races, including the aquatic Boron, the ritualistic insect-like Paranid, the aggressive Split, and the reptilian Teladi. The game’s eight corporations also offer secondary storylines that you can follow to see where they lead; don’t forget to explore out-of-the-way places too: they may hold fascinating secrets.

Lehahn elaborates: “When you choose a character, you basically select a starting point: a different ship, different relations to the races, another place to start in this huge universe, and a few special missions.”

There’s plenty to explore, and you decide how to experience those adventures: you can accumulate resources and ply the trading lanes with your wares, amassing a vast fortune in the process, or you can assemble a mighty military operation, building factories to produce ships and weapons and even training marines to board enemy capitol ships. Or you can travel the shady side and become an intergalactic pirate; just make sure you’re willing to endure the wrath of most of the pilots you come across.
Read the full article at the link below.

Apple Games: X3 Terran Conflict
Virtual Programming
X3: Terran Conflict



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No Quick Weapon Switching In Diablo III
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | 6 comments

Diii.net recently posted the final two sections of an interview with Blizzard Entertainment's Jay Wilson about Diablo III, the upcoming continuation of its action RPG franchise. The Q&As this time covered a variety of topics including character build variety, player vs player, respecs, guild support, and the decision to eliminate the quick weapon switch hot key in D3.

Diii.net: Weapon switch hotkey?
Jay Wilson: No. We took that out.

Diii.net: Oh, I loved that feature in D2.
Jay Wilson: Mostly we took it out because the only examples we could come up with of how people used it were somewhat exploitive. Most frequently people used it by accident and wondered where the freak my weapons went. So it didn’t seem a useful feature for anyone but a very small portion of the audience that used it to swap items for magic find purposes, which seemed not a great super fun reason to swap weapons. There were probably some other uses, which I’m sure I’ll be reminded of in the forums.

Diii.net: The Witch Doctor build seems fairly narrow in concept. He’ll always have mongrels for tanking, some mini-mage support, and some minion attacks and a bit of mind control. Looking at his skill tree now, there doesn’t seem to be that many potential Witch Doctor builds, which isn’t true of the Wizard or Barbarian. Can you comment on that? Is it just that we don’t know enough about the Witch Doctor yet?
Jay Wilson: The Witch Doctor is less developed than the Wizard and the Barbarian. His skills are on what we call a second round, a second revision, while the Barbarian and Wizard are firmly in their third, maybe even their fourth revision. So as every time we revisit the systems we expand the abilities. It’s based on playing them. We discover basically the same things, and we’ll say something like, “Oh, this class seems a little bit more focused than we wanted. We can’t make this kind of build the way we wanted to.” So we end up expanding them over time.
In the game, every class is different. Some classes offer themselves up to a lot of variations. Some classes tend to have a lot more focus. We saw that in Diablo II, some classes had fewer variations and fewer possibilities than the others. That’s not really our goal though. Our goal is to make sure that every class is equally diverse in the types of builds they can be made for.
Head over to the pages listed below to learn more.

Diii.net: Diablo III Character Builds, Variety
Diii.net: Diablo III Quick Weapon Switch & More
Blizzard Entertainment
Diablo III
Buy Diablo III



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Max Schaefer In The Torchlight
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | Comment on this story

G4TV has posted a new interview with Runic Games CEO Max Schaefer about the company's upcoming action RPG, Torchlight The game will give players the chance to choose a character and venture from the safety of the town of Torchlight into randomly generated dungeon levels. Once inside they will find a variety of monsters, a large selection of loot to find, and quests to complete.

G4: With Mythos and Torchlight, I know they're different games, but it's a similar style. What's so appealing of that Diablo-style of game that you want to keep going back to it?
Schaefer: It's got a couple of things that we really like about it.
One, it's simultaneously easier than WASD [Editor's Note: A standard control setup for first-person games, referring to the W, S, A and D keys] and then [you get] free mouse look -- you need a little less coordination, which is important for people like me. It's also…it lends itself to a little bit more of a visceral game. You click on a monster and he swings and it's immediate and it just feels more like you're doing things than you're piloting a guy around a universe. It feels like you're actually doing the actions in a weird sort of way. So we really try to run with that. We make everything visceral in the game. Just picking up a potion and putting it back down should sound good and feel good. We really [pushed], throughout the game's design, [that] everything should feel satisfying, and when you hit a monster, it should land with a thump and it should be responsive to your mouse click and you should get a lot of feedback from that. The item game is kind of similar, too; it's a slot machine mechanic. You're getting little bonuses, little jackpots as you go and then medium jackpots every now and then big jackpots every few hours. It's kind of a feedback system and style that we've just latched on to right from the early Diablo days.

G4: The art style for Torchlight is definitely unique -- very stylized. Can you tell me a little about where that was born out of?
Jason Beck: It was building off of what we thought we were honing in on with Mythos and definitely analyzing what we thought worked, what didn't work, getting around the pipeline that we had for Mythos. It's definitely a lot more efficient and effective for the tools we have now for Torchlight. The biggest thing was, we tried to experiment with a few things out [and] by a tiny coincidence, the D3 [Diablo III] stuff came out and we said "well, we can't go that route." We'd already built on the somewhat casual look, so it just pushed us more towards the classic animation-type setup where you've got these painterly backgrounds and really crisp, stylized, almost comic book-style characters on the top of it. Again, our art team shares a certain sensibility about what we link and it did seem like a pretty natural fit for us.
Visit the website below for more of the interview.

G4TV: Torchlight Interview
Runic Games
Torchlight
Buy Torchlight


Mac Games News for Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Eschalon: Book II Box Art Unveiled6:00 AM
More Singers Announced For The Sims 3 World Adventures6:00 AM
The Three Musketeers: The Game Arrives For Mac6:00 AM
World Of Warcraft Accounts Merge With Battle.net November 116:00 AM
 
View all of the Mac games news for Wednesday, October 14, 2009 on one page


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