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Friday, February 1, 2008


AssistiveGaming.com Launches
6:00 AM | IMG News | 1 comment

AssistiveWare recently announced the launch of AssistiveGaming.com, a new website devoted to bringing game related information to Mac users who have physical disabilities. IMG contributor Michael Phillips serves as editor for the site which offers news, game reviews, and other articles related to game accessibility.

Check out their release:

AssistiveWare, at the ATIA tradeshow in Orlando, announced a new web site about gaming on Mac OS X: AssistiveGaming.com. This new site is created by and for Mac users with disabilities and provides information on how people with physical disabilities can enjoy the latest and greatest games on Mac OS X.

The site has three main sections: (1) Feature articles about general gaming topics; (2) Reviews discussing individual games; (3) Short descriptions of games with a special focus on their accessibility.

"I have been designing universal access solutions for Mac OS X since 2002 and one of the most frequently asked questions by users is not whether they can do their homework or write the next great novel, but about what games can be played," said David Niemeijer, AssistiveWare's CTO. "With AssistiveGaming.com we have created a platform where users can exchange their gaming experiences and can share tips and tricks."

"I have been gaming with a switch on the Mac since 1995, long before Mac OS X, long before sites like this even existed. I had no guidance, no advice," said Michael Phillips, AssistiveGaming editor and long-time Inside Mac Games contributor. "Part of me totally understands why this site is important, but another part finds it kind of sad. I notice that both assistive technology users and specialists are afraid to try new things, think outside the box, or worse, people never even consider the fact that gaming is possible at all."

The Assistive Gaming team welcomes additional contributors, irrespective of what special access hardware and/or software they use or what games they like to play.
For more information check out the AssistiveGaming site at the link below.

AssistiveGaming


IMG: Unreal Tournament 3 First Look, Fairy Treasure Review
7:56 AM | Tuncer Deniz | Comment on this story

Inside Mac Games has posted a first look preview of MacSoft's upcoming Unreal Tournament 3. Here's a clip from the preview:

In a new twist to the Unreal Tournament franchise, victories will earn the player bonuses in the form of cards. Cards are kept in an inventory on the map screen and may be played before entering a battle zone. Each card offers a bonus that lasts for the duration of a match. For instance, a card might offer vehicle armor upgrades or enhanced health for one’s entire team. It’s Castle Risk meets the blood drenched world of Unreal.
IMG has also posted a review of Fairy Treasure.

To check out both articles, please follow the links below.

Inside Mac Games First Look: Unreal Tournament 3
Inside Mac Games Review: Fairy Treasure



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Bomberman For iPod Reviewed
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | Comment on this story

Applelinks recently posted a new review of Bomberman, one of the many titles available for Apple's iPod multimedia device. In the game players must use their wits and bombs to make their way to the end of the maze levels without being caught by enemies. Applelinks gave Bomberman a score of 4 out of 5.

From the review:

Like nearly every maze game before and after it, Bomberman has you navigating a little character through a top-down view of a walled room. You're being chased by an assortment of bad guys who get progressively faster and sneakier. Unlike other games, however, you don't eat or shoot your enemies, you bomb them. Power-ups will help you on your way, but it's otherwise just you and your bombs throughout.

And the bombs aren't just for killing; that's not all they do. They also blast holes in the walls to help you work your way through them, and to reveal the secret exits to the next level. This all starts off fairly simply, as the monsters are slow and dumb. After about the fifth level, however, things change drastically; the monsters become much more motivated to prevent Bomberman's escape, and the mazes become harder to navigate. You'll need to find power-ups and learn how to properly use them if you want to survive.
Check out the full review at the link provided below.

Applelinks: Bomberman Review



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The Broken Hourglass Q&A
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | Comment on this story

GameBanshee has published a lengthy interview with Planewalker Games producer Jason Compton about the independent studio’s upcoming party-based RPG, The Broken Hourglass. The interview also includes four exclusive screenshots from the game.

GB: Tell us about the game's "infinite dungeon" and "arena play" modes. Are these entirely separate from the game's main campaign?

Jason: Yes, they are completely different play modes. You can start an Infinite Dungeon or Arena game with the same character you started a Broken Hourglass game with, or define new characters just for those game sessions.

Arena mode is a simple "Can my guys beat up your guys?" test of power and skill. You must start an Arena game with at least one character, but from the Arena screen you can add characters and creatures from the game to your team, and build an opposing team from the same list. You are dropped into a special combat zone, given a gaggle of equipment in party inventory, and then combat begins. Simple stuff, really, but it seemed like a fun way to blow off steam.

Infinite Dungeon mode is a little different, although like Arena mode it's basically just an excuse to have a lot of combat challenges. The premise for ID mode is taken from old roguelikes and their early PC offshoots like Sword of Fargoal—you are after the Object of Great Desire and, after you hack your way through X number of maps consisting of increasing levels of difficulty, you may find it and win the game. The maps are simply taken from The Broken Hourglass, but rather than leading to city neighborhoods, they are connected with one another in completely random fashion, and instead of being populated with our carefully-crafted townspeople and guards and dancers and so forth, are instead full of hostiles, as well as randomly placed traps and loot. As mentioned, there's still a little finishing work to be done on ID mode, but that's the upshot.
Head over to the site below to read the rest of the Q&A

GameBanshee: Jason Compton Interview
The Broken Hourglass



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Mark Rein Discusses Unreal Tournament 3
6:00 AM | Cord Kruse | Comment on this story

A new interview from Guardian Unlimited features commentary from Epic Games' Mark Rein about all things Unreal Tournament 3. The interview covers a range of topics including specifics about the console versions, work on Unreal Engine 4, future projects for the company, and hardcore gamers shifting from PCs to consoles.

Do you see a future where Epic develops a game completely outside of the first- or even third-person shooter genres and just does something completely different?
I don't see that happening in the short-term. I'd love to get a small team working on some cool stuff, but the problem is they get sucked in to the larger projects. A big game like UT3 has a certain amount of gravity and it just pulls people in. We love making shooters, and I'm certain there are still countless ways we can improve in that genre. We look at Gears of War and we see the pimples, we look at UT3 and think 'we should also do this, we should also try that, if only we had more time and more people, we could have done...' so I think we're continually looking at our own games and thinking there are lots of unfinished puzzles left to solve before we move on to something else.
And, obviously, all game developers are constantly looking at each others' work for inspiration. There's still a lot of low hanging fruit in this genre - we need to pick some more of that.

Traditionally the FPS was very much a strong point for PC, but now do you think consoles are catching up?
I'm a real fan of the PC, but yes, consoles are definitely stealing a lot of hardcore gamers from the PC. When Call of Duty 4 came out, I heard some of our guys sitting around talking about the great game they'd had last night and I'm like, 'Hey guys, what server are you playing on? I'd love to come and join you,' and they said, 'Just send us a friends request,' It was at that point I realized they were all playing it on console. Plus, the sales of the console versions are something like ten times the sales of the PC versions.
Read the rest of the Q&A at the link provided below.

Guardian Unlimited: Mark Rein Q&A
Epic Games
MacSoft
Unreal Tournament 3


Mac Games News for Thursday, January 31, 2008

Apple Games Features Tomb Raider Anniversary6:00 AM
Exploring Aquaria's Watery Realm6:00 AM
Fairy Treasure Reviewed6:00 AM
WoW Boosts Vivendi Games Sales To $1.5 Billion6:00 AM
 
View all of the Mac games news for Thursday, January 31, 2008 on one page


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