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The Secret History of Mac Gaming


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#21 Cougar

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Posted 28 April 2016 - 09:17 PM

View PostMatt Diamond, on 28 April 2016 - 02:57 PM, said:


PoP was originally developed for the Apple ][ though.. But if there was some other angle that put Mechner in the book, I'd be all for it.


Apple II, Mac... what's the difference? :P

#22 mossy_11

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 01:30 AM

Alright, lots of stuff to respond to.

View PostCougar, on 28 April 2016 - 12:24 PM, said:

As a Cyan fanatic, I'd be awesome if you could interview Rand and Robyn Miller. And there really isn't a whole lot out there about the early days of Cyan. Most interviews are about Myst and onwards.

I was a mere babe when most of these games were in vogue, so I will be reading this book primarily to be edumacated. So I will cede the games that you should cover to old people like Matt. But I'd add Prince of Persia to his list, and Ferazel's Wand (my favorite platformer.) Also, Pangea Software, since most of their games were bundled with iMacs.

Aside from that, it would be great if you could devote part of the book (maybe the ending?) to the question of archiving. Your book is a way in itself of preserving the heritage of Mac games, but what of the games themselves? i.e I stated above that the only way for me to play Cosmic Osmo today is to play it in Windows, and that sucks. Many Mac-only games are very difficult if not impossible to play nowadays. Recently with iOS, we've seen a bit of a resurgence in old games getting ported to the platform, but touch controls are often not ideal, and oftentimes there are legal issues preventing games from being ported. (Ferazel's Wand will forever be stuck in Sheepshaver because the developer had a falling out with Ambrosia. Sigh.)

Archiving is an especially pertinent issue for Mac software because Apple doesn't give a crap about backwards compatibility; Microsoft has the opposite problem because they are beholden to slow-moving businesses.

(As a side note, if anyone is interested in a cool science fiction story about philosophical problems of AI under the guise of porting/archiving issues, I recommend The Lifecycle of Software Objects by Ted Chiang. And Chiang in general; he's amazing.)
I had long interviews with both Rand and Robyn. They were surprised that I was so keen to discuss their pre-Myst stuff. I adore those early Cyan games, so rest assured they will get lots of attention. As noted elsewhere in this thread, I'll be telling the Manhole portion of the story in an upcoming podcast episode. But the book will go deeper still into their pre-Myst work.

PoP may get a mention, but interviewing Jordan Mechner goes too far beyond the scope of the book. I have enough work squeezing it all into 100,000 words as it is. I've interviewed Ferazel's Wand (and Harry the Handsome Executive as well as a few lesser-known games) creator Ben Spees. I also had a two-hour interview with Pangea's Brian Greenstone.

The archiving note is an interesting one. Sites like Mac Garden have done a brilliant job on preservation of the original games, but emulation of pre-Intel Macs is not great. And as you say, not only is it possible to play old Windows games in recent Windows versions without an emulator but also many classic Mac games have been rereleased for Windows but not OS X. I'll think about it, but I can probably talk a bit about this in the concluding chapter.

As a side note, I had wanted one of the reward tiers to be a collection of shareware and public domain Mac games, for which I would have written a guide to help people understand the context of each game and get them started playing it. I couldn't figure out a way to do it such that someone could get the collection and have it just work. They'd need to download and set up an emulator first. I didn't feel comfortable asking for money for a reward that would require so much technical know-how on the backer's part.

View PostMatt Diamond, on 28 April 2016 - 09:10 AM, said:

Edit: author Richard Moss appeared in the thread before I finished posting this! But the question still stands...

Gentlemen,

It's clear that Mr. Richard Moss has done his homework. He's got Delta Tao, Ambrosia, Cyan, Freeverse, Bungie, John Calhoun (Glider Pro) and Glenda Adams in there. Many others whose names I don't know but whose games I'd probably recognize in a heartbeat. I think I saw The Colony flash by in the video..

Are there any games or creators that you didn't see, and are afraid he might miss?

My thoughts:

Cap'n Magneto by Al Evans: Possibly not the first Mac shareware game I saw, but its the first one I remember. Sadly I was a poor college student at the time and never sent him money. One of the inspirations for me to work on my own shareware game, though I didn't release it until years later.

Fools Errand by Cliff Johnson: Aside from being a good puzzle game, you can see Cliff playing with this new user interface and being inspired by it. There's a puzzle requiring dragging along a narrow path; another requires rapid precision clicking. A couple clues are hidden until you mouse over them. And one particularly devious puzzle which was only solvable by exploiting the way early Mac programs processed events: if you clicked on the menubar the game was effectively frozen until you finished selecting a menu item.

Duane Blehm: I saw his name flash by in the video but I'd like to know more about him. His name appeared on several pieces of 80's shareware including Stuntcopter, but he died young ("suddenly", which might be a euphemism for suicide). The story I heard was that at first his grieving mother didn't know why so many checks were coming in for him; she didn't know about his hobby. That's all I know but I've never forgotten him; I'd love to learn more.

--
As a footnote it might be interesting for the book to mention that some of the old games live on in some form or another. Examples include Return to Dark Castle; Cliff Johnson's sequel to Fools Errand; the kickstarted Shadowgate remake. Even Cap'n Magneto is apparently playable again, still shareware.

Which reminds me: I believe I owe Al Evans $20.
I tried contacting Al Evans last year and he never responded. Will try him again. I've talked to Cliff Johnson about his career before. (And not everything from that interview made it into the article.) I would love to talk to Duane Blehm's family, but don't know if I could track them down. Likewise, there aren't many records of BBS/Usenet/etc discussions from that time. I am asking other shareware devs from the era about him and his work, though, so he certainly won't be glossed over.

View Postmacdude22, on 28 April 2016 - 08:55 AM, said:

Is it full of old mac games?
It is full of stories about how old Mac games were made and played (and in some cases expanded upon by fans).

View PostMatt Diamond, on 28 April 2016 - 04:27 PM, said:

More suggestions:

Chris Crawford is a highly influential game designer, cofounder of GDC, but controversial and outspoken. He had a huge hit with Balance of Power. Trust and Betrayal was a very innovative game that sold poorly (kicking myself for selling my copy of that.) He wrote other innovative games, some for Mac. (He includes post-mortems of most or all of his games in one of his computer game design books.)

3 in Three: Another Cliff Johnson classic. Never got ported from Mac.

Inline Design published a bunch of Mac games that also appeared on other platforms, and its not clear to me which ones were Mac-first. Mutant Beach was Mac only (unfortunately my copy was unplayable on any Mac except my first because it didn't cap the frame rate.) Inline also published Darwin's Dilemma, which I loved but again I don't know if it was Mac first.

Maxis? Mac and Amiga were the launch platforms for SimCity. Maxis was not a Mac-first or Mac-only developer, but they released almost every games for Mac, until they got bought by EA. So I don't think they quite fit the theme of the book, but maybe they're illustrative of the market.

=
Okay, I'm spending way too much time on this. Sorry for the flood, everyone!
I spoke to Chris Crawford last year about his new thing and he said he was happy to talk to me for this book. I just have to set up an interview. Inline Design I hadn't considered — will look into them. I've been torn about Maxis. I'm thinking about maybe contacting Will Wright because I know the original SimCity's UI was inspired by MacPaint and SimCity 2000 was made on a Mac then ported to DOS. I'll be mentioning how Maxis and Blizzard were among the only companies that treated Mac users as equals when I get into the porting houses chapter.

Anything else?
Author of The Secret History of Mac Gaming - https://unbound.co.uk/books/macgaming - publishing (northern hemisphere) Spring 2018

#23 Matt Diamond

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Posted 29 April 2016 - 07:53 AM

I finally paid Al the $20 I owed him for playing Cap'n Magneto in the eighties. While I was at it, I included a note on my payment mentioning the book-- worth a shot.

Quote

Anything else?
I know I'm forgetting some, but you've done such a fantastic job so far that I'm just looking forward to re-discovering them when I read the book. Still, if I get some time I'll browse through some old shareware CD collections, see what memories that triggers.

And thanks for those Cliff Johnson and Chris Crawford articles- turns out I'd read both of them but I needed reminding!
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#24 Matt Diamond

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Posted 30 April 2016 - 06:47 PM

Sorry, I can't stop thinking about this. It's a very personal topic for me. :-)

A few favorite shareware and freeware titles from the early days:
  • Taskmaker - RPG from small Mac-only publisher Storm Impact, which operated from 1989 to 1997.
  • Rescue - really fun game; pity it so shamelessly infringed on Star Trek's intellectual property. I think that's what killed it but not positive.
  • Missions of the Reliant - also Trek inspired; it had scripted missions. Someone tried to resurrect it 6 years ago
1995 book called of Tricks of the Mac Game Programming Gurus: Only three authors listed on the cover but I think other influential developers of the time may have contributed. Used copies of the book are very cheap on Amazon-- might be a fun way to pick up a few names. (There's an interview with Jason Jones in it-- too bad it's entirely technical.)

==
Here are some things that happened in the 2000's. Maybe good for a footnote or two. Most of them reflect the shift towards iOS games.

iDevGames: pretty much dead now, but in the 2000's it ran some Mac game dev contests. And some winners from the contests went on to do great things. A few I know of:
  • David Rosen: 2002 winner Black Shades; he founded Wolfire Games and published Luguru. His brother Jeff Rosen joined later. Jeff Rosen is now well-known for creating Humble Bundle.
  • Justin Ficarrotta won with Kill Dr Cote, later published by Freeverse as Kill Monty. He later moved into iOS development.
  • Rocco Bowling: he did well in contests, then wrote a few games for Freeverse, and is now a succcesful iOS developer. All covered in this interview.
  • David Frampton: 2003 winner w/Chopper, which he took shareware. He got in on the App Store gold rush by quickly porting Chopper to iOS. Then he did The Blockheads. Now he's semi-retired on the proceeds, and surfs a lot.
Decline of Inside Mac Games: You could talk to the founder Tuncer Deniz about it..

Unity Technologies: hard to remember that they got their start with the Mac-only game Gooball, published by Ambrosia. And Unity was itself Mac-only for a while.
Now they've transcended that beginning, and in a way that's a reflection of the market in general. Maybe Unity itself helped dry up the Mac-only market, but perhaps that's overstating their influence.
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#25 Camper-Hunter

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 01:28 AM

View PostMatt Diamond, on 30 April 2016 - 06:47 PM, said:

A few favorite shareware and freeware titles from the early days:
  • Taskmaker - RPG from small Mac-only publisher Storm Impact, which operated from 1989 to 1997.
Yes, TaskMaker and its follow-up Tomb of TaskMaker were very good.

Another good Mac-only RPG was Odyssey - The Legend of Nemesis.

No one mentionned Jeff Vogel's Spiderweb Software? Still active, but older titles fit the topic.

Edit: flight sims:
- Parsoft's Hellcats over the Pacific and A-10 Attack
- Graphsim's F/A-18 Hornet
- Donald A. Hill Jr.'s Bullseye's Fokker Triplane and P51 Mustang: these ones are really old, Fokker is from 1985. Also Ferrari Grand Prix from the same company (obviously a driving sim this one).

Edit 2: another classic RPG was The Dungeon of Doom (1986).

#26 mossy_11

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 03:36 AM

View PostMatt Diamond, on 30 April 2016 - 06:47 PM, said:

Sorry, I can't stop thinking about this. It's a very personal topic for me. :-)

Don't apologise. This sort of passion is precisely what made Mac gaming special.

Quote

A few favorite shareware and freeware titles from the early days:
  • Taskmaker - RPG from small Mac-only publisher Storm Impact, which operated from 1989 to 1997.
  • Rescue - really fun game; pity it so shamelessly infringed on Star Trek's intellectual property. I think that's what killed it but not positive.
  • Missions of the Reliant - also Trek inspired; it had scripted missions. Someone tried to resurrect it 6 years ago

Taskmaker and Tomb of the TaskMaker have been on my radar for a little while. Will check them out soon and already have one of the devs David Cook on my list of people to contact (not just for those two games but also for the wonderful MacSki). I'm not familiar with Rescue but will look into it and its creator's story. Missions of the Reliant I also don't know but after you and somebody on Twitter both brought it up I'll definitely be including it in some capacity.

Quote

1995 book called of Tricks of the Mac Game Programming Gurus: Only three authors listed on the cover but I think other influential developers of the time may have contributed. Used copies of the book are very cheap on Amazon-- might be a fun way to pick up a few names. (There's an interview with Jason Jones in it-- too bad it's entirely technical.)

I'm familiar with the book. Too technical for me to draw much from for the story I'm telling, but I'll double check the list of devs who contributed. Earlier in my research I also got a hold of copies of some other old Mac games books — The Macintosh Bible Guide Games, Marvelous Mac Games, Cool Mac Games Plus, and Pangea Software's Ultimate Game Programming Guide (which Brian Greenstone actually didn't remember writing when I asked him about it).

Quote

Here are some things that happened in the 2000's. Maybe good for a footnote or two. Most of them reflect the shift towards iOS games.

iDevGames: pretty much dead now, but in the 2000's it ran some Mac game dev contests. And some winners from the contests went on to do great things. A few I know of:
  • David Rosen: 2002 winner Black Shades; he founded Wolfire Games and published Luguru. His brother Jeff Rosen joined later. Jeff Rosen is now well-known for creating Humble Bundle.
  • Justin Ficarrotta won with Kill Dr Cote, later published by Freeverse as Kill Monty. He later moved into iOS development.
  • Rocco Bowling: he did well in contests, then wrote a few games for Freeverse, and is now a succcesful iOS developer. All covered in this interview.
  • David Frampton: 2003 winner w/Chopper, which he took shareware. He got in on the App Store gold rush by quickly porting Chopper to iOS. Then he did The Blockheads. Now he's semi-retired on the proceeds, and surfs a lot.
Decline of Inside Mac Games: You could talk to the founder Tuncer Deniz about it..

Unity Technologies: hard to remember that they got their start with the Mac-only game Gooball, published by Ambrosia. And Unity was itself Mac-only for a while.
Now they've transcended that beginning, and in a way that's a reflection of the market in general. Maybe Unity itself helped dry up the Mac-only market, but perhaps that's overstating their influence.

I'm not going to be dedicating much space to stuff after 2000, but thanks for the iDev/uDevGames notes. I spoke to one former member of that community (Karl Becker) a while back about his HyperCard stuff and his sports games KGA Golf and KTA Tennis. The decline of Inside Mac Games is totally something I'd like to fit in (although the story of the rise of IMG has greater priority). And I had forgotten that bit of Unity trivia. Thank you for the reminder. That fits remarkably well with one of the closing points Craig and I have talked about for the narrative.

View PostCamper-Hunter, on 01 May 2016 - 01:28 AM, said:

Another good Mac-only RPG was Odyssey - The Legend of Nemesis.

Also on my radar since I discovered it on Mac Garden late last year.

Quote

No one mentionned Jeff Vogel's Spiderweb Software? Still active, but older titles fit the topic.

I tried contacting Jeff recently and haven't heard anything back. Even if I'm not able to interview him, though, he'll be in the book (thankfully I can piece a fair bit together from prior interviews). Exile was a pretty significant entry into the mid-90s shareware market.

Quote

flight sims:
- Parsoft's Hellcats over the Pacific and A-10 Attack
- Graphsim's F/A-18 Hornet
- Donald A. Hill Jr.'s Bullseye's Fokker Triplane and P51 Mustang: these ones are really old, Fokker is from 1985. Also Ferrari Grand Prix from the same company (obviously a driving sim this one).

There'll be a chapter dedicated to Mac flight sims. Had a great interview with Trey from GraphSim. Craig knew knows those guys personally and has fun stories as well. Planning on reaching out to Eric Parker of Parsoft fame this week. Sadly, Don died from cancer in 2009. (I'll still mention him and his games, of course.)
Author of The Secret History of Mac Gaming - https://unbound.co.uk/books/macgaming - publishing (northern hemisphere) Spring 2018

#27 Thain Esh Kelch

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 06:25 AM

Funny, Jeff is very pro-indie and old school gaming hyping, so this would fit right up his ally I believe. Maybe try and contact him again?
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#28 Tacohead

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 09:52 AM

Perhaps another idea for a chapter in this most interesting book could focus around the stories behind some of the very unique ports of the time. Back in those black and white Macintosh days some developers really went all out when bringing their games to the Mac after they had been originally available for MS-DOS. The higher resolution (512x384) black-and-white Macintosh screens with their mouse-based interfaces, plus the ability to play digitized sounds and music really presented a great opportunity for those that made the effort to take advantage of it. Why they made these efforts for such a small market I do not know but I'm so grateful they did.

I remember some of my MS-DOS friends, with their crappy 16 color (320x200) EGA displays being a bit jealous of some of the superior looking (and sounding) Mac versions. You need only take a look at screenshots of the various versions back then to see just how big of a difference there was. And then there were also the interface and sound improvements as well. At some point in the early 1990s these particular differences between Macs and other platforms basically all but vanished. From that point on PC and Mac versions were largely identical save performance issues which is another story. Companies like Feral and Aspyr add nice little touches to their ports these days but that's mostly in the pregame options windows and so forth.

I always wondered what was the motivation behind some of these ports? They certainly couldn't have expected to get rich or anything. Were they labors of love? Were they just experiments? I think this splashscreen from Wizardry: Proving Grounds of the Mad Overlord, or MacWizardry as some called it, perhaps says it best about some of these pioneers back then.

Posted Image

Aside from MacWizardry Two other great examples of this were the Macintosh ports of Might and Magic Book 1: Secrets of the Inner Sanctum and Pirates!

Posted Image

Posted Image

Those were great times! Really looking forward to this book!

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#29 Matt Diamond

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 09:56 AM

View Postmossy_11, on 01 May 2016 - 03:36 AM, said:

Pangea Software's Ultimate Game Programming Guide (which Brian Greenstone actually didn't remember writing when I asked him about it).
Wow-- I wonder if I've forgotten something big that I once did!... Er, probably not.

View Postmossy_11, on 01 May 2016 - 03:36 AM, said:

I'm not going to be dedicating much space to stuff after 2000
Understood.

View Postmossy_11, on 01 May 2016 - 03:36 AM, said:

The decline of Inside Mac Games is totally something I'd like to fit in (although the story of the rise of IMG has greater priority).
Yes, PLEASE concentrate more on IMG's heydey. :-)
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#30 Matt Diamond

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Posted 01 May 2016 - 10:43 AM

View PostTacohead, on 01 May 2016 - 09:52 AM, said:

Perhaps another idea for a chapter in this most interesting book could focus around the stories behind some of the very unique ports of the time.  ...
I always wondered what was the motivation behind some of these ports? They certainly couldn't have expected to get rich or anything. Were they labors of love?

That's an interesting question! It would be neat to ask them.

I'm just thinking aloud here, but I bet there were multiple reasons. In the case of Wizardry, those guys cut their teeth on Apple ][. Guessing they had a soft spot for Macintosh.

It's also worth remembering that Apple ][ game market was huge; for all anyone knew the Mac market was going to be similar. (Maybe if Macs had been a lot cheaper?) Meanwhile the IBM PC was trying to conquer the business market. It's kind of funny actually how that played out. Apple was desperate for the Mac to be taken seriously and had an on-again-off-again attitude to games, and despite IBM's initial efforts PCs eventually took over computer gaming.

I like to think that in some cases, the developer just had a grand vision for their game and the Mac's capabilities just got them closer to it.

You've reminded me of a great example! Heaven and Earth was a GORGEOUS puzzle game on the Mac. Take a look at this screenshot of the main menu on Macintosh Garden:
Posted Image

And they used pallette animation to make the fire and water ripple!
VGA version wasn't TOO bad, but clearly inferior. I don't know if the colors were animated.
Posted Image
Here is the visual travesty that is the DOS version:
Posted Image


TBH I was going to mention Heaven and Earth earlier, but I couldn't figure out if it was Mac-first. Seems like it must have been at DESIGNED with the Mac in mind though.

I just noticed that Wikipedia only lists the DOS version. Travesty! I'll fix that if I can ever figure out their markup.
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#31 mossy_11

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 08:01 PM

View PostTacohead, on 01 May 2016 - 09:52 AM, said:

Perhaps another idea for a chapter in this most interesting book could focus around the stories behind some of the very unique ports of the time.

Not sure if I'll have space to do a whole chapter about this, but great idea. I'll see if I can get a few stories or at least quotes in there as part of the catch-all porting chapter (with Westlake, Logicware, MacPlay, MacSoft, Aspyr, etc) or in one of the early chapters about the first few years of Mac gaming.
Author of The Secret History of Mac Gaming - https://unbound.co.uk/books/macgaming - publishing (northern hemisphere) Spring 2018

#32 Matt Diamond

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 09:10 PM

An article about the book mentioned Crystal Quest-- how could I have forgotten Crystal Quest?!? I still remember the distinctive sound each crystal made as you picked it up.

Incidentally, increasing your pledge is a PITA. The website doesn't handle it, you have to send them an email. They will eventually cancel your pledge and then you are free to pick a new pledge level. (Note the webpage helpfully does not tell you your current level.) The process seems to take at least 5 days, and if you were proud of how early you are listed among the supporters, you may need to give that position up (I'll post an update when I know for sure.)

So unlike kickstarter you need to plan ahead. Don't plan on increasing your pledge near the end as things get exciting, or every time new rewards are unveiled. Might be best to just increase it right now, by a lot. :-)
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#33 Cougar

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Posted 02 May 2016 - 10:08 PM

Regarding fuzzy information about funding, do projects have a...time limit? Or is it up to the creators to decide when a project isn't going to get the necessary funding?

#34 mossy_11

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Posted 03 May 2016 - 01:17 AM

View PostMatt Diamond, on 02 May 2016 - 09:10 PM, said:

An article about the book mentioned Crystal Quest-- how could I have forgotten Crystal Quest?!? I still remember the distinctive sound each crystal made as you picked it up.

I'm interviewing Crystal Quest creator Patrick Buckland over email at the moment, so let me know if there's anything you want to ask him. Here's a fun bit of trivia about how he wound up co-founding Stainless Games (of Carmaggedon fame):

"The game ended-up on a huge percentage of Macs in the late 80’s, but almost none of them had paid for it! Including the old schoolmate of mine who I reconnected with in the early 90’s and formed Stainless with, Neil “nobby” Barnden. He’d been playing his pirate copy of it for years until he suddenly noticed my name on the front screen and looked me up in the phone book to see what I was doing!"

Quote

Incidentally, increasing your pledge is a PITA. The website doesn't handle it, you have to send them an email. They will eventually cancel your pledge and then you are free to pick a new pledge level. (Note the webpage helpfully does not tell you your current level.) The process seems to take at least 5 days, and if you were proud of how early you are listed among the supporters, you may need to give that position up (I'll post an update when I know for sure.)

So unlike kickstarter you need to plan ahead. Don't plan on increasing your pledge near the end as things get exciting, or every time new rewards are unveiled. Might be best to just increase it right now, by a lot. :-)

Ugh, sorry to hear that. I had no idea they had it set up in such an unfriendly manner. I'm a little annoyed right now that there's also an approval delay before my updates get emailed out and my question replies appear on the site. (It never occurred to me to ask about these things before we launched the campaign.)

View PostCougar, on 02 May 2016 - 10:08 PM, said:

Regarding fuzzy information about funding, do projects have a...time limit? Or is it up to the creators to decide when a project isn't going to get the necessary funding?

The campaign runs for three months (it started on April 26) or until Unbound and I mutually agree to cancel it. I have no idea why they don't have a countdown timer — it's part of the psychology of how Kickstarter has done so well.

By the way, for anyone reading this thread who hasn't pledged, I got Steve Tze's art print confirmed. (He's the guy who defined the look and feel of Burning Monkey Solitaire and pretty much everything else Freeverse made.) Here's a low-res copy of the image:
Posted Image

Edited by mossy_11, 03 May 2016 - 01:29 AM.

Author of The Secret History of Mac Gaming - https://unbound.co.uk/books/macgaming - publishing (northern hemisphere) Spring 2018

#35 MichalM.Mac

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 07:09 AM

With current pace of funding I am strating to get bit skeptical. I check unbound page every other day but pledged sum is not rising much.

What is going to happen if unbound campaign is unsuccessful?

#36 Matt Diamond

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Posted 13 May 2016 - 03:45 PM

i haven't been graphing the progress but I thought it was going pretty well. This isn't Kickstarter; there's a longer period of time allowed before they make you take your project down.

On the minus side, this isn't Kickstarter so there's no countdown timer to motivate a big push at the end, and the Unbound platform is a lot smaller. Pledgers also can't upgrade their support level as easily. So it could start to fizzle. But Richard is getting mentions in various places, he's on twitter, etc. Also he's going to release a podcast specifically about The Manhole soon-- I'd put money(*) on Cyan mentioning the podcast at least in a future Obduction post.

In other words, Rich seems to be pretty good at the PR side. Slow and steady is good enough to win this race.

(*) Two dollars.

View Postmossy_11, on 03 May 2016 - 01:17 AM, said:

Steve Tze's art print

It's beautiful! It's even got a hidden Jared!
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#37 Matt Diamond

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 07:59 PM

View PostMichalM.Mac, on 13 May 2016 - 07:09 AM, said:

With current pace of funding I am strating to get bit skeptical. I check unbound page every other day but pledged sum is not rising much.

What is going to happen if unbound campaign is unsuccessful?

Hm, it does seem to have stalled at 29% for the last few days so maybe I was too dismissive of your concern in my last reply. But personally I am still optimistic, for the reasons I gave.
Matt Diamond - www.mindthecube.com
Measure twice, cut once, curse three or four times.

#38 mossy_11

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Posted 14 May 2016 - 09:25 PM

The pace has definitely slowed. We've had 11 pledges and gone up 1% in the last three days, and over the past week we've gone up 3%.

But as Matt noted, this is a long campaign. We're in week 3 now, and the campaign lasts for three months — not 30 days, as is the norm with Kickstarter.

I've had to concentrate on freelance work recently, but will be releasing some new stuff (eg. essay on Medium, podcast on The Manhole) and lining up new media coverage and forum discussions in the next week. I have other plans and ideas for promotional things down the line, too, and my tweets about the book continue to generate interest (and most importantly traffic to the campaign page). So it's much too soon to give up. If we're still below 50% funded a month from now, then I'll be very concerned.

MichalM.Mac said:

What is going to happen if unbound campaign is unsuccessful?

Backers will get their money back and I will have to find another way to get the book published. Simple as that.
Author of The Secret History of Mac Gaming - https://unbound.co.uk/books/macgaming - publishing (northern hemisphere) Spring 2018

#39 Matt Diamond

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 08:40 PM

I sent a note to Peter Cohen, asking if he'd cover this in his blog. This would have been right in his wheelhouse back in the day, but he still writes and presumably has an audience. Worth a shot I guess.
Matt Diamond - www.mindthecube.com
Measure twice, cut once, curse three or four times.

#40 mossy_11

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Posted 15 May 2016 - 09:12 PM

I know he shared it on Facebook. He'll actually be in the book, too. I interviewed him about his old websites Tikkabik and MacGaming.com (and of course we also chatted about a bunch of other Mac gaming things).
Author of The Secret History of Mac Gaming - https://unbound.co.uk/books/macgaming - publishing (northern hemisphere) Spring 2018