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Trust & Betrayal: Legacy of Siboot kickstarter


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#1 Matt Diamond

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 08:25 PM

Not sure whether this game belongs best under puzzles, strategy, or simulators..

The Kickstarter for a remake of Trust and Betrayal is almost over:
https://www.kickstar...44670315/siboot

Trust and Betrayal was an old school classic I bought and played on my old b&w Mac Plus. It was written by Chris Crawford (Balance of Power, Balance of the Planet, many others). Chris is an outspoken game designer and critic, co-founder of the GDC who then quit it to pursue an esoteric, possibly futile quest to expand the limits of interactive fiction.

This is a far cry from the usual Kickstarters I have supported, but I have followed Chris's games & writings off and on since the 1980's. Crawford can be infuriating but he's also a very interesting figure and an influential computer game designer.

The original T&B game was basically Rock Paper Scissors, but you had limited supplies of each item. Each day you would visit your friends and enemies, chat with them, trade information, make promises not to attack or not to reveal secrets, and in some cases break those promises. At night, you would attack or be attacked, and you'd try to choose the correct rock/paper/scissors that would beat the other person, based on what you'd learned. You'd chat with the other (computer controlled) players was a visually appealing icon-based language that let you convey fairly involved statements, but you weren't allowed to lie with it. You could however try to bully weak characters or play meek around the aggressive ones, to influence them.

It was way ahead of its time then, and in some ways still is.

If you are a student of computer game history or design, or like strange games, or find Chris's rants against the mainstream computer game industry entertaining, check it out.
Matt Diamond - www.mindthecube.com
Measure twice, cut once, curse three or four times.