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Telepath Tactics Composer Interviewed

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Posted 22 September 2014 - 01:32 AM

Sinister Design's Craig Stern recently posted a new interview with Ryan Richko, the composer for the company's upcoming Telepath Tactics. Set in the world of the Telepath RPG universe, the turn-based multiplayer tactics game will feature support for up to six players in hotseat mode, a new art style, redesigned UI, and a new combat engine.

What first attracted you to working on Telepath Tactics?

Iím a HUGE fan of role playing games (RPGs). I grew up with video games in the 80ís when Nintendo first came out. My first RPG was Final Fantasy. It changed my life. I was so drawn into the story, music, and tactical gameplay. It was really fascinating. To this day, my favorite series is Final Fantasy and I continue to play RPGs almost exclusively. So naturally, when I saw an opportunity to score a game like Telepath Tactics, (which reminded me of Final Fantasy Tactics) I was pretty excited. It seemed surreal to be able to score a game that so closely resembles the joy of my childhood. Telepath Tactics has so many new gameplay features never seen before in a tactical RPG which makes it unique and interesting. Also the developer was from my hometown of Chicago. =P

How do you think scoring music for a game differs from scoring for film?

Itís completely different, in most cases. Every project is unique. Some games/films require a unique perspective on scoring. And most developers/directors have a clear idea of what they want and how they want to do it. In a general sense though, scoring for games is harder in my opinion. You have to be a lot more musical, memorable, and keep the player engaged at all times. Not to mention the songs have to loop seamlessly. In film, there are only special moments to bring out great music with a wonderful melody. But if you overdo it, the film will be ruined. You never want to be bigger than the characters. Youíre only accenting whats happening on screen. In games you can really go all out and I love that!

Click on the link below to read the full interview.
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