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NTFS Partition.


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#1 Dark_Archon

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:34 PM

Can you read data from an NTFS partition on your hard drive when using OS X?
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#2 Tesseract

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 10:58 PM

Based solely on the existence of /System/Library/Filesystems/ntfs.fs and /System/Library/Extensions/ntfs.kext, I'm going to go with a solid "Probably."

#3 bobbob

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 11:45 PM

If you try, you'd find out that you can. You can't write, though.

#4 Huntn

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 07:40 AM

View Postbobbob, on July 27th 2006, 12:45 AM, said:

If you try, you'd find out that you can. You can't write, though.

What is the other hd format that Windows is using? Can the Mac write to that?

#5 Tesseract

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Posted 27 July 2006 - 10:06 AM

View PostHuntn, on July 27th 2006, 11:40 PM, said:

What is the other hd format that Windows is using? Can the Mac write to that?
FAT32 is very common on things like USB flash drives, camera memory cards, and the like. It's usable by just about everything.

#6 Greg Grant

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 02:48 PM

I don't know if OS X can read "dynamic" NTFS but it certainly will read basic NTFS. As bobbob mentioned, it will not however, write to NTFS.  Unless you need the partition scalability of Dynamic, I recommend using basic whenever possible as dynamic has a habit of being unreadable by other installs of Windows.

Also, as Tesseract mentioned, FAT32 is what you'd use for an iPod that you wanted to be readable by both PCs and Macs.
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#7 Batcat

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Posted 15 August 2006 - 05:00 PM

As a side note, NTFS has been updated with each iteration of its OS- e.g., NT4, Win 2000 and XP each have a slightly different version. Newer versions can read older versions but not vice versa.

#8 Huntn

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 03:45 PM

I'd like to clarify this issue for myself and the Windows Gaming FAQ.

As links are perishable, the pertinant contents of this Informit.com link is stated below.

If I may summarize:
1. NTFS partitions are read only when booting into Mac OSX.
2. FAT partitions-The Mac can access Windows files but Windows can't see or access Mac files?

Questions:
* What file system comes naturally on the Mac?
* Is there a two way system for file transfer?
* If you want cross file compatibility, if it can only be one way, I'm inclined to think that the best solution would be able to move files from Windows to Mac, but I'm not sure about that.
* Regarding 1. above, has that changed as I saw an article saying that as of MacOS 10.3 there is NTFS support in the MacOS?
* Regarding 1. above, can files be copied from the Windows partition and pasted into the Mac section? I assume read only means "read only" but I thought I'd ask anyway.
* If using NTFS, if the Mac can only read data in an NTFS partition, can Windows place see or place files from the Windows portion of the HD into the Mac portion?
* I'm not sure how external storage will address this issue- any thoughts?

Other links:
Que Publishing Imaging for Intel Macs Part 2: How to Efficiently Deploy Windows with Mac OS X on Intel Macs.

Digital Inspiration Boot Camp Tutorial: Install Windows XP on Mac in 5 steps.


From Informit.com:
It might sound strange to those who work with Windows that I mentioned NTFS as a limitation. From a Windows perspective, NTFS is typically the prime choice of disk format because it is a journaled format, supports file local file permissions, enables disk space compression, and makes it possible to seamlessly encrypt files so that only specific users can access them. All of them are very good things and in a Windows environment are preferable to the legacy FAT/FAT 32 format. However, NTFS partitions on an Intel Mac are read-only when booting into Mac OS X.

Unless you provide some external storage, users cannot transfer or access files between both Windows and Mac OS X on the same computer. That said, even using the FAT format doesn’t provide the best solution because in addition to being a weaker file system, the file access is still a one-way system. Users can access Windows files from Mac OS X, but not vice versa. Also, it means that users will have unrestricted access to the file system, which is never a good idea because they could inadvertently move, delete, or alter critical Windows files.

Another solution is to install a Mac disk utility for Windows as part of your installation. Tools such as MacOpener can make the Mac OS X partition available from Windows. But this is a one-way solution if you opt to use NTFS. And again, these tools generally allow access to the entire Mac OS file system.

The better solution is to provide external storage support for users. This not only provides users storage space regardless of which operating system they are using, it also offers security advantages. You can limit user access to the local file systems, and you can secure and ensure backup of the share points that users will use for their files.


#9 PeopleLikeFrank

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 04:32 PM

View PostHuntn, on January 20th 2007, 04:45 PM, said:

I'd like to clarify this issue for myself and the Windows Gaming FAQ.

As links are perishable, the pertinant contents of this Informit.com link is stated below.

If I may summarize:
1. NTFS partitions are read only when booting into Mac OSX.

Yes.

Quote

2. FAT partitions-The Mac can access Windows files but Windows can't see or access Mac files?
No - with FAT, both OSX and Windows can read and write.

Quote

Questions:
* What file system comes naturally on the Mac?

HFS or HFS+

Quote

* Is there a two way system for file transfer?
See above - a FAT partition can be read and written to by both, but it has some limitations.

Quote

* If you want cross file compatibility, if it can only be one way, I'm inclined to think that the best solution would be able to move files from Windows to Mac, but I'm not sure about that.
* Regarding 1. above, has that changed as I saw an article saying that as of MacOS 10.3 there is NTFS support in the MacOS?
* Regarding 1. above, can files be copied from the Windows partition and pasted into the Mac section? I assume read only means "read only" but I thought I'd ask anyway.

Yes, OSX can read NTFS, which means it can copy files from a NTFS partition to its own.

Quote

* If using NTFS, if the Mac can only read data in an NTFS partition, can Windows place see or place files from the Windows portion of the HD into the Mac portion?
No. Windows can't even see the data on an HFS/HFS+ partition, it will be totally invisible.

Quote

* I'm not sure how external storage will address this issue- any thoughts?

The same as internal storage. Most USB keys are cross compatible because they're formatted as FAT, but any external harddrive is the same thing as an internal one, and its formatting will determine compatibility.
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#10 Dark_Archon

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Posted 20 January 2007 - 06:19 PM

I ended up leaving a 20 GB fat32 file exchange partition and used the rest of the drive for a Windows NTFS partition. I can get stuff from my Windows partition in Mac OS X without a problem, and now I can just drop what I need in Windows into the Fat32 partition.
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#11 Huntn

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 01:17 PM

View Postnobody, on January 20th 2007, 04:32 PM, said:

No - with FAT, both OSX and Windows can read and write.

Thanks for the answers!

I quote this from the article:
That said, even using the FAT format doesn’t provide the best solution because in addition to being a weaker file system, the file access is still a one-way system. Users can access Windows files from Mac OS X, but not vice versa.

Could you comment? Thanks again.

#12 Dark_Archon

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 02:19 PM

View PostHuntn, on January 21st 2007, 02:17 PM, said:

Thanks for the answers!

I quote this from the article:
That said, even using the FAT format doesn’t provide the best solution because in addition to being a weaker file system, the file access is still a one-way system. Users can access Windows files from Mac OS X, but not vice versa.

Could you comment? Thanks again.

You can read from and write to FAT formatted disks in almost any operating system. That is why USB thumb-drives all use the FAT filesystem.
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#13 PeopleLikeFrank

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Posted 21 January 2007 - 02:48 PM

View PostHuntn, on January 21st 2007, 02:17 PM, said:

I quote this from the article:
That said, even using the FAT format doesn’t provide the best solution because in addition to being a weaker file system, the file access is still a one-way system. Users can access Windows files from Mac OS X, but not vice versa.

Could you comment? Thanks again.

No - that's wrong. I've formatted external drives to FAT for exactly this reason. Besides, it doesn't make sense. FAT is what DOS used, so why would Windows be unable to use it when OS X can?
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#14 Tesseract

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 07:17 PM

I just found out about MacFUSE, which looks like it will be the way to go for read/write access to NTFS volumes.