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Game installation: Mac v.s. PC


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#21 PeopleLikeFrank

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 12:46 PM

I just wanted to point out that Quake3 was originally distributed for Mac using the PC disk/downloadable Mac app method. So that, in any case, was perfectly legal.
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#22 bobbob

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Posted 21 August 2006 - 08:27 PM

View Postdimmer, on August 21st 2006, 10:56 AM, said:

Sorry Bobbob, but if the original language source is still under copyright you do need to license it for translation

I was talking about importing copies, not publishing your own. Commissioning a translation is indeed still legal, though, you just can't republish without the copyright owner's permission.

#23 dimmer

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Posted 30 August 2006 - 01:03 PM

View Postbobbob, on August 21st 2006, 07:27 PM, said:

I was talking about importing copies, not publishing your own. Commissioning a translation is indeed still legal, though, you just can't republish without the copyright owner's permission.

Hmm, you mean if you employ a translator to "convert" a copy you own for your own use as you can't read the source? No-one would ever, ever go after you for such a thing but technically it is illegal under international copyright law. Pick up a paperback you have to hand and in the frontispieces you'll see something such as:

Copyright <some year or other>. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner or any form without the written permission of the publisher.

So you'll just have to send that Slovakian girl you employed to give you better versions of Dostoevsky back home, unless you have other uses for her than book learnin'...

#24 Tesseract

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Posted 31 August 2006 - 04:06 AM

View Postdimmer, on August 31st 2006, 05:03 AM, said:

Hmm, you mean if you employ a translator to "convert" a copy you own for your own use as you can't read the source? No-one would ever, ever go after you for such a thing but technically it is illegal under international copyright law.
It actually depends on your local laws. In many places, making a translation for personal use is allowed.

Quote

So you'll just have to send that Slovakian girl you employed to give you better versions of Dostoevsky back home, unless you have other uses for her than book learnin'...
I hope that was intentional irony, given that Dostoevsky's works are in the public domain. :)