Jump to content


WoW-Life After 60 IMG Feature


  • Please log in to reply
56 replies to this topic

#1 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 12 December 2005 - 12:17 PM

I am in the middle stages of an IMG feature titled: WoW-Life After 60. I'm soliciting input on different aspects of WoW from IMG members who play WoW. I have my opinions formed, but I'd like to hear contrasting views. Yes, I can be influenced. :D

Item 1- I'm categorizing Wow Players into 3 main categories:

1. Hardcore players- play 20+ hrs per week, quickly achieved the level cap, who are happy with level 60 game play, spending most of their time dungeon crawling high-end instances in large raid groups or play BGs.

2. Softcore players (Happy or Unhappy)
---Happy= play 20+ hrs per week, quickly achieved the level cap, who are happy doing level 60 questing and occasionally high-end instances.

---Unhappy= play 20+ hrs per week, quickly achieved the level cap, who are mostly not happy with level 60 game-play as compared to the previous 59 levels.

3. Casual players (Happy or Unhappy)
--- Happy= who are having a great time leveling or recently achieved the level cap and still are evaluating high-end game play or are happy questing, occasionally hitting BGs and the high-end instances.

---Unhappy= unhappy leveling their characters or recently achieved the level cap and/or are not happy with top end game-play.

Question- Is this a fair way to categorize players? Too complicated or too simplified?

Item 2- All though I'm solidly in category 2 (unhappy), I intend on presenting a balanced view of the game and show that to remain competitive, players at level 60 must embrace Battle Grounds or the high-end instances to acquire epic gear.

*So can a casual gamer have a great time at the WoW level cap?

*Must you embrace the high-end instances and/or BGs to enjoy WoW at the level cap?

*Must you acquire epic gear to remain competitive in the WoW?

Thanks! :)

-Hunt'n

#2 Tibur

Tibur

    Heroic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 12 December 2005 - 01:12 PM

I am a casual WoW player, between 10-20 hours per week.  I leveled a few months back, and quickly lost interest in running high-end instances as I found them too chaotic and time-consuming.  I don't often have 5 hours (assuming no wipes) to devote to running an instance.  I am also not especially good at PvP and I don't really enjoy it all that much.

Consequently, my access to high-level gear is pretty limited and I am thus at even more of a disadvantage in PvP and in running high-level instances.  I suppose I could go in and solo a low level instance and sell all the gear from that to get enough gold to buy high-level gear at the auction house, but that doesn't sound very fun.  

So, my level 60 lurks in Ironforge, mostly offline (although I recently started him towards Silithus, as I've heard there's some things for a level 60 to do there, either solo or a small group).  My time has been occupied by a Horde character I created on a PvP server (trying to improve my PvP skills, although getting run down by 4 level 60s on my first foray into contested territory (at level 22) didn't seem like very good practice - must have been fun for them to one-shot kill a lowbie like me).

#3 The_O

The_O

    Fanatic

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 12 December 2005 - 02:32 PM

I'm a hardcore player.  I've got 3 level 60s - a Hunter, a Mage and a Warrior on Whisperwind, a PvE server.  I've got a 35 Warlock on Frostwolf (PvP) and a few low level alts on Whisperwind.

I'm having fun running high level instances and raiding.  I'm also PvPing with my Mage - up to Sergeant Major (Rank 5).


Can a casual gamer have fun at 60?  Sure.  But I think you need to be part of a great guild, otherwise you're relegated to the hell of pickup groups.

Do you have to embrace high level instances or battlegrounds?  Not necessarily.  I have, but you might have fun questing in Silithus, or helping others through lower instances.  Eventually, though, you'll have to either start an alt, grind, or do high level instances or BGs.

Do you have to acquire epic gear to remain competitive?  That depends on what competitive is.  WoW suffers from caster itemization problems now - epic weapons are super powerful, and we don't have a counter to them.  As I get more epics maybe I'll be able to take more, but now it's an issue.  But if you just want to have fun with friends, epics don't matter.

#4 iEvan

iEvan

    Heroic

  • IMG Writers
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 12 December 2005 - 04:09 PM

I was a hardcore player... right from the closed beta until I hit Lvl 60. I have yet to touch that game in months now. I enjoyed the single player feel of the game, however once I reached Lvl 60... it became "Me & 39 of my buddies vs. Azeroth". Not quite as appealing to me.. especially when I don't have large chunks of my day to devote to one single instance run. Instead of the outcome of a quest being on my shoulders.. it became.. well I hope nothing goes wrong now that I'm four hours into this instance and one single guy doesn't decide to do a "Leeroy" or his Mum decides he's played too long on the computer.

uh.. sorry.. started ranting there.

Yeah.. there is still stuff to do when you hit Lvl 60. Sithilus, and battlegrounds (if you can wait around for a few hours. Rumors of one of the features of the expansion pack might fix that issue though!). You can always help guilds too with your expertise, or help with their web site.

But all in all.. until the expansion pack comes out.. my character is still in stasis.

Remember guns don't kill people... Pfhor do.


#5 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 13 December 2005 - 06:47 AM

Thanks Tibur, O, and iEvan for your responses. Different perceptions of the game are very helpful.

Item 3 In WoW I see 2 phases of the game- Phase 1 leveling, and Phase 2 post cap actitivies- mostly raiding your behind off and maybe doing some battlegrounds (pvp arenas).

I'm finding that Phase 1 is what attracted me to WoW. Phase 2 has been a bust all though I don't mean to suggest it's not a great source of gaming fun for the hard core gamers. I will say to accel there, you must be playiing a lot, addicted or not and you must be in an organized guild. I've heard some horror stories regarding pick up groups (pugs) in the high end instances.

Item 4 True or False- Virtually every piece of epic gear, especially armor parts of a set,  falls off mobs in raid instances?

Every piece I've checked at thottbot comes out of Molten Core, Onyxia, Scholomance, Stratholme, or Black Rock Mountain instances.

-Hunt'n

Edited by Huntn, 13 December 2005 - 09:29 AM.


#6 The_O

The_O

    Fanatic

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 51 posts

Posted 13 December 2005 - 05:11 PM

3 - Sure, you can make a case for that division.  There are other things to do, of course, but that's not an unreasonable interpretation.

4 - Most epic items come from the high end raid content.  Is it reasonable to expect to get the best epic gear from something you can solo?

You can get some nice epic gear by pvping, but that takes a TON of time.  Other epics are random world drops (Dwarven Hand Cannon, etc) or quest rewards.  You can get a nice epic necklace from Darkmoon Faire for 1200 tickets - a lot, but achievable solo.

BRD, LBRS, Stratholme and Scholomance aren't raid instances.  They are 5 man instances that are frequently raided because that's easier.  There is very little epic gear there, but those are where you get your blue set items (along with UBRS).

Dire Maul (especially a Tribute run in Dire Maul North) is another good place for loot, and a nicely put together dungeon.

Onyxia and the bosses in MC, Blackwing Lair and Zul'Gurub drop 2-3 epics each.  My guild and our allies currently have most of MC on farm status (we've spawned Majordomo but wiped to him spectacularly) and we killed Onyxia on Saturday (the first time we'd tried in months), so we've got a nice number of epics flowing in.

Endgame is basically raiding, pvping and building faction with various groups.

#7 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 13 December 2005 - 06:34 PM

The_O, on December 13th 2005, 05:11 PM, said:

BRD, LBRS, Stratholme and Scholomance aren't raid instances.  They are 5 man instances that are frequently raided because that's easier.  There is very little epic gear there, but those are where you get your blue set items (along with UBRS).

View Post


I misspoke saying raid instance.

The_O, on December 13th 2005, 05:11 PM, said:

Endgame is basically raiding, pvping and building faction with various groups.

View Post


That does not sound good to me, all though I'm getting a bit more into BGs.

-Hunt'n

#8 hambone

hambone

    Legendary

  • IMG Writers
  • 890 posts
  • Location:Toronto -- Land of the rising snow

Posted 13 December 2005 - 11:18 PM

Two thoughts on the 60 cap.

One aspect of this issue that might be worthy of some consideration are the unique requirements that Mac gamers have as regards WoW as a primary (*the* primary?) current RPG experience on our platform. Many of us seem to enjoy WoW as a great solo RPG with the social aspect being an occasional "bonus" (or at least, not a hindrance). But at 60, the solo aspect comes to a complete end. We want WoW to continue filling a rather large gap in the Mac game library post-Baldur's Gate and post-Neverwinter Nights, but it just can't oblige. Where else can we look on the Mac for a massively explorable, 3D, quality solo RPG experience in the fantasy genre? Nowhere, as far as I know (though props to Prarie Games' recent effort). This, I think, is a core reason Mac gamers in particular are more dissatisfied with the post-60 experience.

As for me, I've finally canceled my WoW account after playing two characters to 60 over the course of the last year. The simple fact that one was Horde and the other Alliance seems to bear out the observation that I was playing WoW primarily as a solo RPG with emphasis on the classic pillars of that genre: exploration, character development, and questing. I enjoyed playing around with my Orc Hunter at level 60 for a month or two, but I simply didn't find the battleground or honor systems worth a subscription fee, and couldn't be bothered to schedule my real life around multi-hour instances and raids.

Can we blame WoW or Blizzard for this lack? As I discussed in some details in my article The Lull, it is a matter of economics. Producing solo content pours a lot of development time and money into a gaming product that will essentially only be played once. And as we've seen with the "power levelers", this content doesn't satisfy for very long. Instead Blizz has tried to give us systems that encourage us to play repeatedly -- the Battlegrounds are the best example of innovation since the others are really just grinds.

But I don't think this is the best way to solve the problem of cost versus replayability. Instead, Blizz needs to focus on Player Created content. Systems that would effect the world geopolitically, such as guilds being able to hold forts as in Shadowbane, would be one great example. Another would be the ability to create new, unique or custom gear with a system that could be as rudimentary as a Horadric Cube recipe process. And players used to love city raids until the dishonor system was implemented; why not apply that mentality to "resource nodes" that can be captured in the over world? There are a million possibilities of player created content that, for whatever reason of economy, technical capacity, or short-sighted engine design, Blizz has completely ignored.

#9 Kerrum

Kerrum

    Fan

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 40 posts

Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:25 AM

I think hambone is right on. WoW is in need of some serious end-game reworking. I played WoW for quite a while and got very sucked into it. Before I froze my account I had two level 60 characters, a few lower level characters, and a decent amount of raiding under my belt.

When I started playing the game, I started up on the same server as a guy who lived down the hallway from me in the dorm. We had GREAT times exploring new lands, questing, and duoing things that no sane Orc would ever consider. It was great fun, but once we hit leve 60 and started the world of raiding the fun factor steadly went down hill.

I do think a large portion of why I stopped enjoying WoW was lack of real end-game content. Anyone major factor was because I was playing on a Mac... I'm serious here me out here.

1.) When I was raiding there was no sort of Mac voice chat program that I could convince the PeeCeers to try out. This made the raid content and pvping a lot less intense. It ment a lot more sitting there stairing at the screen waiting for someone to get ready to pull the next lava pack.

2.) On my computer (G4 1.4GHz, 1.5GB ram, GeForce4Ti) performance in any dungeon with more than 20 people was hardly tolerable. Now, I know I'm not using the top-of-the-line computer here. My system *should* be able to handle WoW well according the system requirements, but once Orgimmar reaches its normal hustle and bustle things come to a halt. Raiding in MC with ~10 FPS (with every single video setting turned down or off) isn't fun especially when you are doing it for hours... And then there was Alterac Valley. When it first came out I loved AV. I liked the quest content woven into the framework of an epic battle; however, I quickly learned that I would be stuck running supply crates and wolves to the quest givers for hours on end because as soon as I stepped anywhere near the frontline everything came to a halt.

Now I'm not ragging on Blizzard, nVidia, or Apple here, but thanks to sub-par video drivers, lousey game code, or a too-slow system bus my gaming fun had come to a total standstill.

With only solo rep grinding left for me to "enjoy" I quickly realized that it wasn't worth my time and money to keep playing.

Now after a few months time, I'm itching to get back into the game, but it is not because of the one or two new things of content they've added. I quite honestly, miss all the friendships I made while playing.

I'm hoping the expansion will bring us something more enjoyable to do at the end-game that doesn't require a 40 person lagfest. I'm also hoping that the new Intel Apple laptops will have a serious overhauling so that mac laptops will have a decent bus speed and video card for once... But hey, I can't ask for everything to be perfect!

Just some thoughts.
-Kerrum

#10 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:46 PM

hambone, on December 13th 2005, 11:18 PM, said:

Two thoughts on the 60 cap.
One aspect of this issue that might be worthy of some consideration are the unique requirements that Mac gamers have as regards WoW as a primary (*the* primary?) current RPG experience on our platform. Many of us seem to enjoy WoW as a great solo RPG with the social aspect being an occasional "bonus" (or at least, not a hindrance). But at 60, the solo aspect comes to a complete end. We want WoW to continue filling a rather large gap in the Mac game library post-Baldur's Gate and post-Neverwinter Nights, but it just can't oblige. Where else can we look on the Mac for a massively explorable, 3D, quality solo RPG experience in the fantasy genre? Nowhere, as far as I know (though props to Prarie Games' recent effort). This, I think, is a core reason Mac gamers in particular are more dissatisfied with the post-60 experience.

View Post


I was never into the other RPGs, but I agree exactly with your statement the the solo aspect of WoW for the most part comes to an end at level 60 as players are funneled into end-game instances or BGs. Many players enjoy the challenge of taking down the boss, but many players such as myself got hooked on WoW for the variety activities such as soloing when I could,  partying when it was necessary, and socializing all of the time. This is what makes WoW a living community.  From level 1-59 I found a nice mix in WoW.

hambone, on December 13th 2005, 11:18 PM, said:

Can we blame WoW or Blizzard for this lack? As I discussed in some details in my article The Lull, it is a matter of economics. Producing solo content pours a lot of development time and money into a gaming product that will essentially only be played once. And as we've seen with the "power levelers", this content doesn't satisfy for very long. Instead Blizz has tried to give us systems that encourage us to play repeatedly -- the Battlegrounds are the best example of innovation since the others are really just grinds.

But I don't think this is the best way to solve the problem of cost versus replayability. Instead, Blizz needs to focus on Player Created content. Systems that would effect the world geopolitically, such as guilds being able to hold forts as in Shadowbane, would be one great example. Another would be the ability to create new, unique or custom gear with a system that could be as rudimentary as a Horadric Cube recipe process. And players used to love city raids until the dishonor system was implemented; why not apply that mentality to "resource nodes" that can be captured in the over world? There are a million possibilities of player created content that, for whatever reason of economy, technical capacity, or short-sighted engine design, Blizz has completely ignored.

View Post


The MMO Lull is an excellent article and will be referenced in WoW-Life After 60.

I might counter that holding forts can only go so far. Granted I played Planetside for 18 months fighting for bases that our faction owned until they were taken from us. And 18 months is longer than the 12 months were I'm burning out with WoW. But even with differences in force structure,  you can only fight for the same bases so many times before you get the been-there-done-that feeling...

Shoot as soon as I saw the problem with WoW's end-game, my solution was to start five alts and start leveling them to avoid the issue. :D But after reading your article, all of a sudden I thought why was I running to DuskWood to collect Goul Fangs for the ump-teenth time? Since then I've taken a big step back. (this is mentioned in the article)

Repetition, whether it's RPGs, or FPS, or RTS, its the bane of game makers. How much repetition can your gaming customers take?

-Hunt'n

#11 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 14 December 2005 - 01:52 PM

Kerrum, on December 14th 2005, 01:25 AM, said:

I do think a large portion of why I stopped enjoying WoW was lack of real end-game content. Anyone major factor was because I was playing on a Mac... I'm serious here me out here.Just

View Post


I agree that the end-game content is lacking. Regarding other issues- Ventrillo and Team Speak are now available for the Mac I believe. There are plenty of Macs that play WoW, so it sounds like a hardware upgrade issue your having. Thanks for the WoW game thoughts.

-Hunt'n

#12 Drizzt

Drizzt

    Heroic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 293 posts
  • Location:Forgotten Realms

Posted 14 December 2005 - 02:14 PM

Huntn if you feel I had anything worthwhile to say in my essay post in that other thread, go ahead and use that as my feedback.  Otherwise I'm afraid I'll end up writing another one of those since I don't view the WoW endgame as that demanding or unfun at all.  Perhaps those of you who like to solo should try console RPGs.  Those are games that you can spend a little bit of time per session, and eventually max your characters out in everything they do.  There's plenty of them out there too.

#13 Tibur

Tibur

    Heroic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Location:California

Posted 14 December 2005 - 02:51 PM

Drizzt, on December 14th 2005, 08:14 PM, said:

Huntn if you feel I had anything worthwhile to say in my essay post in that other thread, go ahead and use that as my feedback.  Otherwise I'm afraid I'll end up writing another one of those since I don't view the WoW endgame as that demanding or unfun at all.  Perhaps those of you who like to solo should try console RPGs.  Those are games that you can spend a little bit of time per session, and eventually max your characters out in everything they do.  There's plenty of them out there too.

View Post

Easy to say when you're Drizzt Do'Urden and likely could solo Onyxia, unlike the rest of us mere mortals, who have to rely on 39 or so of our "close friends".   :P

I know, I know.  "Different strokes for different folks", etc.  Part of the reason I so enjoy RPGs, though, is that my avatar becomes this uberbeing who, by all rights, should eventually be able to solo a dragon (maybe not necessarily an uberdragon, but a dragon nonetheless) because he/she is approaching demigod status.  I don't even object to having to put together a well-balanced party of five or so, because I was definitely used to that from AD&D.  Maybe the answer for me is NWN or NWN II (assuming it comes out for the Mac).  I wonder there's a way for Blizzard to set up another group of servers for those who prefer solo and small groups.  Keep everything the same but scale down the mobs' and bosses' HP and DPS and eliminate raid groups except for PvP?  All raid instances would be 5-person instances, and all 5-person instances would be solo-able.  Probably too big a headache, and I'd eventually get tired of running MC with the other 4 people in my group, too, I guess.  I'll stop thinking out loud, now, sorry.

#14 Kerrum

Kerrum

    Fan

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 40 posts

Posted 14 December 2005 - 04:26 PM

Sorry for all the typos in my last post.

Let me rephrase the complaint I was making about WoW end-game and system performance:

The MAJORITY of end-game WoW content right now relies on 20-80 players interacting in one location. When I reached level sixty and started raiding/massive PvPing I quickly found that although my computer was technically "above" the minimum system requirements, I had no hope or prayer of being able to participate in this end-game content due to system lag. I feel this is a problem for the more casual players of either platform (those of us who don't have the latest and greatest gaming machine at our side). People running on at or slightly above minimum req. systems are finding that they don't enjoy the end-game because it is like watching a slideshow for hours.

I feel this issue is a larger problem for the Mac users out there. This is because something in the game-code, video drivers, or system hardware is causing Macs to run WoW much more slowly than PCs with equivalent hardware specs. Now granted I'm trying to run a state of the art game on a G4 computer that was released in 2001 (note: It has been heavily upgraded), but if you head to the Mac Support forums hosted by Blizzard you will find that even the newest PowerBook laptops can't run the end-game content at a satisfactory rate. The Blizzard developers have decided to pin the blame for this problem on the bus speed. To a degree, I agree with them, but I still feel there is something flawed with the WoW game design if a brand new $3000 laptop from Apple cannot handle the game play. Even the users of dual 2.5GHz and 2.7GHz G5s say that they cannot turn all the video settings up all the way and keep the game playable.

As frustrated as I am by this, I still have great respect for Apple and Blizzard. The GMs at the Mac Support forum are some of the most responsive, intelligent, and helpful persons I've had to deal with when it comes to customer support. While trying to improve my system performance, I even exchanged a few e-mails with the head sound technician. (Remember one of the strange Mac only patch notes about multiple error messages occurring from too many sounds playing at once? That change in the patch resulted from my interactions with this fellow.)

Blizzard has been doing a great job at improving the performance of WoW for the Mac. Each patch seems to gain us 1 FPS or so. :) Yet I still feel that there is something wrong with the end-game content being spoiled purely due to the age of my computer. This was never an issue before level 60 because I never had to deal with that many people at any given time (other than the auction house). What I'm trying to say is that in my view this is another way that Blizzard's end-game design really seems to fall shot.

I'm sorry if this has come across as more of a personal rant than anything else. I don't mean it to be. I hope my rewording of the complaint here has made it more relevant to the reason why this thread was started in the first place. (The connection was there in my head to begin with. It just didn't come out the right way.)

-Kerrum

#15 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 14 December 2005 - 07:44 PM

Drizzt, on December 14th 2005, 02:14 PM, said:

Huntn if you feel I had anything worthwhile to say in my essay post in that other thread, go ahead and use that as my feedback.  Otherwise I'm afraid I'll end up writing another one of those since I don't view the WoW endgame as that demanding or unfun at all.  Perhaps those of you who like to solo should try console RPGs.  Those are games that you can spend a little bit of time per session, and eventually max your characters out in everything they do.  There's plenty of them out there too.

View Post


I just checked 3 other threads and did not see it. I might have read it. Can you point me at it?

Regarding this response, I like soloing and I like partying on my terms. Please allow me to express my self without suggesting I quit the game. If your thrilled with WoW from front to back I'm very happy for you, really. :)

Tibur, on December 14th 2005, 02:51 PM, said:

Maybe the answer for me is NWN or NWN II (assuming it comes out for the Mac).  I wonder there's a way for Blizzard to set up another group of servers for those who prefer solo and small groups.  Keep everything the same but scale down the mobs' and bosses' HP and DPS and eliminate raid groups except for PvP?  All raid instances would be 5-person instances, and all 5-person instances would be solo-able.  Probably too big a headache, and I'd eventually get tired of running MC with the other 4 people in my group, too, I guess.  I'll stop thinking out loud, now, sorry.

View Post


Your idea is brilliant. My change to your suggestion would be to keep all the 5-person instances as 5 person instances. By their nature, Instances require more effort imo. And I don't know if you were including instances like stockades, deadmines, etc. I would not want to make all of the great below-60 instances soloable for their intended participants. Its just too bad Blizzard does not have more of a mix at the top end so all of the epic stuff is not just in the 40 player raid instances. I understand the concept that epic fights deserve epic gear. It's just that if your not into epic fights is there a future for you and WoW?

-Hunt'n

#16 a2daj

a2daj

    Uberspewer

  • IMG Pro Users
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3400 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 15 December 2005 - 02:23 AM

The craptacular system bus speed on G4s is a significant issue that does affect performance.  You can only push so much data through a 167 MHz bus.  Just because someone pays a lot of money for something doesn't guarantee it'll be the fastest, or even perform decently.  The problem with the Powerbooks is we pay so much for something which is stuck in the stone ages in terms of system busses.  Even so, the PowerBooks perform good enough for the majority of the WoW content.

Blizzard has also admitted in their forums that there are optimizations that they need to do as well as Apple, NVIDIA, and ATI.  There are some GUI optimizations in the upcoming 1.9 patch that will supposedly help in raids.  Those optimizations should also affect normal game play although the impact may not be as noticeable.
Dual 2.5 GHz G5-RADEON X800 -4 GB RAM-Revo 7.1
MBP 2.0GHz -Mobility RADEON X1600-2 GB RAM

#17 hambone

hambone

    Legendary

  • IMG Writers
  • 890 posts
  • Location:Toronto -- Land of the rising snow

Posted 15 December 2005 - 10:48 AM

back on topic...

here is something you might want to ponder in your article Hunt'n. it comes from the interview with a WoW designer at Computer and Videogames ( http://www.computera...p(que)id=131118 )

"Q: We've read that there're plans to allow the more casual gamers that don't grind in Molten Core and the like to get hold of equipment via quests that are on a par with the items that drop in current end-game instances. Could you tell us more about your designs here and how this will impact current end-game epic gear?

A: Shane Dabiri: I don't recall that we've said this exactly. However, as regards the expansion, there are certainly some considerations going in for the casual gamer, such as the design of some of the new dungeons being tailored around a more casual play style. We're definitely keeping the needs of casual gamers in mind as we move forward. In general, one of the goals that we try to maintain is to link the quality of the reward to the level of the challenge, not necessarily the amount of time invested."

#18 Huntn

Huntn

    Verbal Windbag

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4074 posts
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 15 December 2005 - 11:10 AM

Thanks Ham, I'll include it. :)
-Hunt'n


hambone, on December 15th 2005, 10:48 AM, said:

back on topic...

here is something you might want to ponder in your article Hunt'n. it comes from the interview with a WoW designer at Computer and Videogames ( http://www.computera...p(que)id=131118 )

View Post



#19 iEvan

iEvan

    Heroic

  • IMG Writers
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada
  • Pro Member:Yes

Posted 15 December 2005 - 11:52 AM

Two little titbits...

1) There was a thread on the official WoW page that Blizzard responded to. Essentially, WoW as we know it was pretty much solo/small group oriented. They refined that as much as possible first and waiting until after the official release then then focus on the multiplayer content (battlegrounds, and massive RAID group quests).

2) There is the rumour that once the expansion pack is released, that battlegrounds will move to a separate server that can be accessed from all other servers... thus pretty much eliminating the waiting queue. My fingers are crossed for this one to be true.

Remember guns don't kill people... Pfhor do.


#20 Drizzt

Drizzt

    Heroic

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 293 posts
  • Location:Forgotten Realms

Posted 15 December 2005 - 01:19 PM

Huntn, on December 15th 2005, 01:44 AM, said:

I just checked 3 other threads and did not see it. I might have read it. Can you point me at it?

Regarding this response, I like soloing and I like partying on my terms. Please allow me to express my self without suggesting I quit the game. If your thrilled with WoW from front to back I'm very happy for you, really. :)


-Hunt'n

View Post


http://www.insidemac...ic=22714&st=20#

Big loooooong response from me.  You might have remembered reading it.

EDIT:The link doesn't jump directly to my post, but it's posts #32 in the thread as well as #34 mainly

And I wasn't telling you to quit the game, but when it sounds like you're paying for something you don't enjoy at the moment, you might consider whether it's worth continuing to pay for in the immediate future.

Tibur, on December 14th 2005, 08:51 PM, said:

Easy to say when you're Drizzt Do'Urden and likely could solo Onyxia, unlike the rest of us mere mortals, who have to rely on 39 or so of our "close friends".   :P

Heh, well if it surprises you at all, my main is a priest, and it's not a night elf (since so many folks on my realm seem to like using them as the closest thing to Drow o_O).  My name here on the forums was just what I first used when I started posting on message boards way back in the day when threads were displayed in their staircase format. ;)