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#41 Tacohead

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 11:53 AM

Huntn, on January 12th 2006, 03:50 PM, said:

Is there any MMO present or future (Mac or PC) that avoids the static world trap?

-Hunt'n

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Aside from Shadowbane, which has already been mentioned, the only MMO I've seen that does this to a certain extent is Clan Lord. However, CL has had some advantages that allows it to do this kind of thing. It's always been a relatively small community on ONE server. So the need to make recycle-able (or repeatable) quests for thousands of players on multiple servers isn't there. So while there are such static things in CL there's also plenty of things that make the CL world more dynamic than other MMOs.

Exploration and discovery has had plenty of examples where this is concerned. In numerous cases when you or your group discovers a new area you get the fame (and sometimes experience) that goes with it because that area can't be "discovered" by anybody again. In many of these cases the discovering individual or group has named an area and that name was incorporated into the game. Some area's have even been named after the individual who first stepped foot in them ("Wisher's  Gate", "Alchemist's Folly", "Jannar's Grove", etc..).

There's been GM-run events that have different, landscape-changing outcomes depending on how we, the players, react. For example, our main town once had a large catapult protecting it's front gate. A long time ago, there was a major invasion by our greatest enemy, the Orga, in which we failed to fend them off well enough so they dragged our catapult away. Over time clues have surfaced as to the location of our catapult, apparently in a huge Orga Stronghold on the far side of the island, so efforts have been made to find this place. A truly massive underground labrynth of caves was discovered with clues that indicate they lead to this Stronghold. Unfortunately these caves are swarming with giant, man-eating, web-throwing Arachnoids and it makes any WoW 20-40 man instance look like child's play. Nobody has yet to breakthrough to the other side. I've been in a group working on this for TWO years and we've come very close. We were so close recently that we could actually hear the Orga drumd beating right above us (and we saw a ladder that leads up)! If we ever make it and defeat the Stronghold it will be a glorious day rolling that catapult back into town.  :)

There have been other, less epic ways for players to make their mark. For example, there's a museum in town filled with statues, paintings, and various works of art, all player-created. There was also once this clan of evil witches (role-played beautifully by their clickers) who had their clan house burned down by another player who's character was an enemy of theirs. To this day the burned ruins of their house are still there.

This is yet another advantage of the single server, small community situation. The GMs tend to really listen to the players and actually know them. You're not a number in CL. So GMs tend to participate in and enhance certain player-driven stories and ideas, in addition to creating their own.

I could go on about the dynamic aspects of CL but this is the general idea. After playing CL so long you could probably understand why it wasn't long before I found WoW pointless and boring.

This post isn't really an endorsement for CL. It's a technologically very old game, and like Vendetta the (great) development team is very small (and mostly voluntary) so content comes at glacial paces. Plus Delta Tao never really seemed interested in making alot of money off of it so never bothered advertising, fixing their atrocious payment system, or internally developing a Windows client. But survive it does because of a small, but loyal, player base, mostly consisting of vets who have been playing for years and are enormously strong (there's no level cap). It's a mom & pop operation which hasn't necessarily been a bad thing for me obviously.  :)

I would LOVE to see many of CL's concepts in other, more technically current, MMOs but I'm not certain it could be done with thousands of players on multiple servers. Until that happens I'm kinda with Whaleman in that MMOs are, for the most part, a waste of time.

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#42 Huntn

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Posted 13 January 2006 - 01:13 PM

Tacohead, on January 13th 2006, 11:53 AM, said:

Exploration and discovery has had plenty of examples where this is concerned. In numerous cases when you or your group discovers a new area you get the fame (and sometimes experience) that goes with it because that area can't be "discovered" by anybody again. In many of these cases the discovering individual or group has named an area and that name was incorporated into the game. Some area's have even been named after the individual who first stepped foot in them ("Wisher's  Gate", "Alchemist's Folly", "Jannar's Grove", etc..).

There's been GM-run events that have different, landscape-changing outcomes depending on how we, the players, react. For example, our main town once had a large catapult protecting it's front gate.

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This is the type of thing that sounds exciting to me in a MMO.

I recently took my WoW level 60 Palladin out on a collection quest and got bored with it so quickly. I mean it's only taken a year for the repetition to set in. ;) Plus I don't like large raids, so it's time to go.

I don't think I can express how much I love many of WoW's regions and characters, but once the quests are done, you are done with that area. WoW favorite spots- Teldrassil, Darkshore, Ashenvale Forest, Elywnn Forest, Westfall, Duskwood, Red Ridge, Wetlands, Arathi Highlands, Hinterlands, Alterac Mountains, Azshara, Felwood, and Wintersping. Most favorite spots- Stranglethorn Veil, Ungoro Crater, Tanaris, and Feralas. Man I could just go out on a picnic and hang out in one of my most favorite spots.

Another problem I see with WoW regions is that they are too small. Sure they seem big the first time you cross one, taking about 8 min to run across one, but it would be so cool to have a single region like Stranglethorn, the size of Kalimdore. I realize it's just wishfull thinking.

The problem with MMOs and exploration is the corporate knowledge aspect. Once someone has found a location or has beaten a quest, in short order it becomes common knowledge which removes the fun of exploration and some of the fun of questing. I've often thought that the entrance to certain caves should move around every so often and when someone enters, it shifts to a different location. But even in this example, soon all of the known locations for the cave would become corporate knowledge. I see this as a large obstacle the MMOs may not be able to overcome.

But for all of this talk about wanting to explore, I acknowledge my guilt. When I was playing Wow, I spent much time on thottbot.com looking for the quick answer to quest locations and items. I was in the fast level up mode. It just seemed to be the thing to do. At the higher levels of play I could level in 3-4 evenings of gameplay.

-Hunt'n

#43 Huntn

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 12:01 PM

Anyone who has read my posts in this forum know I'm a WoW (burned-out) junkie. Hey now I actually have time to do other stuff until I find another worthy MMO to play!  :P

My view of the ideal MMORPG is drastically changing. For long term gameplay, I no longer think WoW is a good starting point for an ideal MMORPG.

If you look at World of Warcraft, you see a landscape, which all though is a beautiful landscape, is a incredibly shallow environment populated with moving targets (A.I. characters and creatures). Take a beautiful setting such as Teldrassil, Elywnn Forest, or Stranglethorn Veil and it's a shame that the majority of a players activity is spent running around slaying constantly regenerating targets. Once enough targets are defeated under the guise of doing a quest, you move onto the next zone and harvest the next batch of targets. Allthough WoW nibbled at some character depth with it's professions, your WoW toon was basically a character without a home and the single minded tasks of killing and harvesting. Advancing professions also centers on the same type of activity- kill and collect. The WoW end game instances take the concept of leveling instances and add difficulty by requiring more players and coordination to defeat dungeon bosses. Based on WoW's premise of PVE combat, the high end instances are a natural progression. And I now see that if a player moves from leveling quests, to leveling instances, to end game instances, due to the shallowness of the gameplay, simply adding new lands and sending players out to once again do simple kill and collect quests will cause long term boredom issues, imo.

I don't claim to be a MMO expert, but these are the MMO formulas I'm aware of:
* PVE Target Practise- such as WoW
* PVP Emphasis- Guild Wars, WoW, Shadowbane
* Environmental/Technology/Social Challenges- Tale in the Desert, Seed, others?
* Other Type MMOs?

Wouldn't it be interesting if you could create a home where you character could live and develop along with quests and an evolving environment? I think this must be the future of MMO's. I would relish the opportunity to pick one of WoW's desirable regions, and actually create a home and develop a character with gameplay depth on multiple fronts.

Currently, I know of 2 interesting MMORPGs Tale in the Desert (Mac Version!) and Seed (No Mac version announced). Both of these games lack the target practise style game play but focus on shaping and changing the environment.  I'm not saying that the lack of conflict make these games more interesting.

All though I don't know how successful TITD is or how fun it would be to actually play, if you read the game manual, it has a huge amount of depth on multiple fronts, concerning lawmaking, religion, leadership, lawmaking, and technology. Yes combat would be nice but currently the closest thing to combat is non-lethal dueling. Are they any TITD players in the forum?

Seed is a soon to be released MMO science fiction story of a colony on a alien planet trying to survive. It involves a skill system that give the character the ability to help the colony survive and have an effect on the evolving environment.

I know I am attracted to combat, so I think a huge challenge would be to create a MMORPG with a blend of conflict and development, to let warrior types to duke it out with the environment, unwelcome invasions, and monsters while allowing settlements to make technology advances along with the elements presented in TITD.

I predict that despite WoW's huge success, as its subscribers cap out, a large percentage will tire of the shallow, singleminded style of game play and will look for MMOs with more depth and balanced challenges.

-Hunt'n

#44 Rubel

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Posted 17 January 2006 - 12:47 PM

View PostHuntn, on January 13th 2006, 12:13 PM, said:


I don't think I can express how much I love many of WoW's regions and characters, but once the quests are done, you are done with that area. WoW favorite spots- Teldrassil, Darkshore, Ashenvale Forest, Elywnn Forest, Westfall, Duskwood, Red Ridge, Wetlands, Arathi Highlands, Hinterlands, Alterac Mountains, Azshara, Felwood, and Wintersping. Most favorite spots- Stranglethorn Veil, Ungoro Crater, Tanaris, and Feralas. Man I could just go out on a picnic and hang out in one of my most favorite spots.


On my server (Shadow Council), the University of Kalimdor runs semi-regular field trips to some of the more exciting and exotic locations. Sometimes they have lectures on the wildlife  :D I guess this is a way for higher-level folks to share and relive the enjoyment of exploring the fascinating regions.
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#45 Huntn

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 09:33 AM

View PostRubel, on January 17th 2006, 12:47 PM, said:

On my server (Shadow Council), the University of Kalimdor runs semi-regular field trips to some of the more exciting and exotic locations. Sometimes they have lectures on the wildlife  :D I guess this is a way for higher-level folks to share and relive the enjoyment of exploring the fascinating regions.

That sounds different. I wonder what level of participation they get? :)

Another MMO talking point- Wide open spaces as in WoW versus 100% instanced questing space as in Guild Wars or Dungeons and Dragons Online. They represent 2 ends of the spectrum. Wide open spaces are great for immersion. The complaint is that some perceive them as acres of wasted space. On the other end, having all questing in instanced space as in GW is totally artificial feeling when the only strangers you can run into are in the designated meeting spaces such as a town. Personally I'd prefer a mix of areas as in WoW.

The question is what happens in the wide open spaces? Are they static or are they evolving? Evolving would be better in my opinion, but I have no experience with such a MMO. I'm aware of 2 MMOs that might offer this possibility- Tale in the Desert (Mac) and Seed (PC-not yet released).

-Hunt'n

#46 Huntn

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 12:07 PM

I just about fell over when I saw screenshots and a movie of RF-Onlinegame.com. This comes from Korea I believe. No Mac version announced. Very high emphasis on pvp. North American beta to start soon sponsored by Codemasters.

-Hunt'n

#47 Morrigan

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Posted 27 January 2006 - 03:40 PM

okay, wow. wowie wow wow.

#48 totallywhacked

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 02:04 AM

I don't agree that WoW's magor flaw is the highend wall that people hit. That's a problem sure. But maybe you could consider it the end of the game, and start over, as I suppose people do.
The Big flaw in WoW is...wait. There are two of them.

1) Repetive nature of quests. The repetitive nature, in fact, of interacting with the world. You walk around and bash things, take their stuff, talk to someone, get xp. Rinse, repeat. And repeat and repeat and repeat. Now it is not that I am saying this is never fun. Clearly not. It holds the attention of millions of people (isn't it millions? I don't actually know). No, it's just that after 300 hours of that, its boring. It's work. It is called "grinding" by hundreds of thousands of those who play.  In WoW I did manage to find a handful of quests that were of a different nature, and they were really really fun. They still involved killing stuff, we never got beyond that, but they had something more to them as well. I really loved the treasure hunt quest, partly because, it was fairly rare that people found it.

2) That your actions are unmeaningful. No matter what you do, be it killing the worst most horrible threat to the alliance, or be it some act of kindness to a townsperson, there are no real consequences. Some people call these "world events" and there are all sorts of reasons why they are rare or nonexistant in WoW. But I refuse to accept that it is impossible to introduce more of these things where your actions influence the world. I'm sure some game could be designed with this feature in mind.
I also love the idea of DM's intervening or making things "work differently" once in a while, or creating a local event that only entertains 20 or 30 people who happen to be nearby....The fact that everthing happens the exact same way everytime,  that we can all "kill" the same monster over and over and over and we all say "have you done the quest where you kill the enormous oger under the bridge in the burned land yet?" detracts fairly seriously from the immersive possibilities of a fantasy game.

#49 Huntn

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 08:20 AM

View Posttotallywhacked, on January 28th 2006, 02:04 AM, said:

I don't agree that WoW's magor flaw is the highend wall that people hit. That's a problem sure. But maybe you could consider it the end of the game, and start over, as I suppose people do.
The Big flaw in WoW is...wait. There are two of them.

1) Repetive nature of quests.........

2) That your actions are unmeaningful........

I'd say the endgame is problem number one because when starting over you end up facing the two problems you mentioned. Not that you have not seen them (the same quests) before, but if repetition was not an issue previously, at some point, it will become one.

The static world problem- As I see it, the huge MMO challenge is the second one you list because with a static world, the expense of churning out new lands to explore seems to be an expensive proposition that not even the most successful company can keep up with. My impression is that the evolving world concept would complicate MMO development 10 fold. Is it impossible to have an evolving world, with combat, and is a commercial success?

-Hunt'n

#50 Eric5h5

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 11:02 AM

Maybe the solution to the "static world" problem is to have all the quests be computer-generated.  That way you don't have to employ an army of people to constantly create new content.  You'd still need people to create content to begin with (the land, and models of people, monsters, buildings, etc.), but then the computer would be in charge of figuring out how it works together, and could handle permanent changes easily (like if a building gets burned down or something).

Obviously that's not a trivial task, but it's possible.  One of the first minor steps in that direction was Captive II, an Amiga game from 10-15 years ago.  It was a Dungeon Master-type game, except futuristic with robots, and all the missions and the layout of cities and buildings were computer-generated.  Now the missions were all the same type (find the captive), and it was a bit buggy (I stopped playing about a dozen missions in because it seemed to dead-end with no solution), but it was a start.  (It was also cool because you could open the heads of the robots in your party and attempt to upgrade them by fiddling with logic gates, which was a mostly undocumented and totally geeky bit of fun.)

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#51 alldaveallen

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 11:31 AM

Quote

1) Repetive nature of quests. The repetitive nature, in fact, of interacting with the world. You walk around and bash things, take their stuff, talk to someone, get xp. Rinse, repeat. And repeat and repeat and repeat. Now it is not that I am saying this is never fun. Clearly not. It holds the attention of millions of people (isn't it millions? I don't actually know). No, it's just that after 300 hours of that, its boring. It's work. It is called "grinding" by hundreds of thousands of those who play.  In WoW I did manage to find a handful of quests that were of a different nature, and they were really really fun. They still involved killing stuff, we never got beyond that, but they had something more to them as well. I really loved the treasure hunt quest, partly because, it was fairly rare that people found it.


and:

2) That your actions are unmeaningful. No matter what you do, be it killing the worst most horrible threat to the alliance, or be it some act of kindness to a townsperson, there are no real consequences. Some people call these "world events" and there are all sorts of reasons why they are rare or nonexistant in WoW. But I refuse to accept that it is impossible to introduce more of these things where your actions influence the world. I'm sure some game could be designed with this feature in mind.
I also love the idea of DM's intervening or making things "work differently" once in a while, or creating a local event that only entertains 20 or 30 people who happen to be nearby....The fact that everthing happens the exact same way everytime,  that we can all "kill" the same monster over and over and over and we all say "have you done the quest where you kill the enormous oger under the bridge in the burned land yet?" detracts fairly seriously from the immersive possibilities of a fantasy game.

1) For many people, computer games are an escape from a world where problems aren't easy to solve to one where basically all you have to do is kill a succession of larger and larger (or more powerful) enemies to solve bigger and bigger problems, while at the same time gathering items or skill points that make your own abilities improve is step with those of the enemies you are facing.  And the content providers know that, and ultimately these MMORPGs are not really all THAT "multiplayer" because they are essentially a bunch of individuals pretending to cooperate in order to get to the next quest. And why would anybody change that?  I think the very idea of an MMORPG is inherently flawed, as long as the point of all of these games is essentially "Go out and kill a bunch of things and find a bunch of stuff--only it's more fun because there are 8 million other people doing the same thing!"

It does seem that some of the WW2 games and maybe "Lineage" address this issue by assigning people different tasks but I honestly don't know if it makes any difference.

2) One of the things I'd like to see in these games are changes in the landscape, caused by battles and alliances. If, say, there was a fantasy game (because apparently those are your choices...elves or aliens) where, say, a group of players who were affiliated with the undead won a big battle, then the contested ground would become "Plaguelands" or whatever (I'm thinking of the Zerg "creep" from Starcraft) and STAY that way, conferring benefits on its undead inhabitants in terms of healing, access to items, etc.  Players on the other side could gain extra XP or some bonus for actually going into that enemy territory and pulling off an assassination or heist, as opposed to fighting on neutral ground.

However, IIRC the membership of the Alliance vs the Horde in WoW is something like 3-1, so I guess unless Blizzard starts offering people incentives to sign up for the losing cause, they couldn't offer that possibility, because of course eventually all of the land would be "Alliance land."

#52 Huntn

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Posted 28 January 2006 - 01:13 PM

View PostEric5h5, on January 28th 2006, 11:02 AM, said:

Maybe the solution to the "static world" problem is to have all the quests be computer-generated.  That way you don't have to employ an army of people to constantly create new content.  You'd still need people to create content to begin with (the land, and models of people, monsters, buildings, etc.), but then the computer would be in charge of figuring out how it works together, and could handle permanent changes easily (like if a building gets burned down or something).

Obviously that's not a trivial task, but it's possible.  One of the first minor steps in that direction was Captive II, an Amiga game from 10-15 years ago.  It was a Dungeon Master-type game, except futuristic with robots, and all the missions and the layout of cities and buildings were computer-generated.  Now the missions were all the same type (find the captive), and it was a bit buggy (I stopped playing about a dozen missions in because it seemed to dead-end with no solution), but it was a start.  (It was also cool because you could open the heads of the robots in your party and attempt to upgrade them by fiddling with logic gates, which was a mostly undocumented and totally geeky bit of fun.)

--Eric

Computer generated quests from a large pool of quests sounds interesting and complicated to make it attractive gaming situation, but not impossible.

Regarding Static vs a changing virtual world, Planetside offers 9 continents (glorified islands) each with a network of bases. Three factions fight for control of the bases. Once a base is won, it remains in the hands of the faction until someone takes it away from them. All though facilities could be "damaged" to the extent of loosing capabilities, the major critique is that bases could not be physically damaged and all bases of the same type (technical speciality) looked exactly the same with the same layout. Depending on how many players were online, factions were given performance adjustments. The question became how many times could you attack the same bases over and over again until you lost the fun?

View Postalldaveallen, on January 28th 2006, 11:31 AM, said:

I think the very idea of an MMORPG is inherently flawed, as long as the point of all of these games is essentially "Go out and kill a bunch of things and find a bunch of stuff--only it's more fun because there are 8 million other people doing the same thing!"

Sounds like you hit WoW on the head. However, most of the time I found fighting different mobs in different locals seemed to keep things interesting for a year until hitting the wall.

-Hunt'n

#53 summerlion

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 01:42 PM

View Posttotallywhacked, on January 28th 2006, 03:04 AM, said:

1) Repetive nature of quests. The repetitive nature, in fact, of interacting with the world. You walk around and bash things, take their stuff, talk to someone, get xp. Rinse, repeat. And repeat and repeat and repeat. Now it is not that I am saying this is never fun. Clearly not. It holds the attention of millions of people (isn't it millions? I don't actually know). No, it's just that after 300 hours of that, its boring. It's work. It is called "grinding" by hundreds of thousands of those who play.  

That's pretty much how *every* computer RPG works though, right?  The graphics just keep getting better.  Wizardry: go into the dungeon and kill things.  When you've killed enough things, go on to the next level dungeon.  << fast forward >> Knights of the Old Republic: kill things.  When you've killed enough things, go on to the next planet.  So I don't think we can blame the problem on World of Warcraft.  As you say, there are millions of subscribers, so this is the game people want.  The only difference between WoW and KOTOR is how many people you're playing with.  In KOTOR, you controlled your whole party.  In WoW, your party is controlled by different people.  So what does WoW offer?  The chance to interact with other people, obviously.  This is the real draw of WoW for people like me.


View Posttotallywhacked, on January 28th 2006, 03:04 AM, said:

2) That your actions are unmeaningful. No matter what you do, be it killing the worst most horrible threat to the alliance, or be it some act of kindness to a townsperson, there are no real consequences. Some people call these "world events" and there are all sorts of reasons why they are rare or nonexistant in WoW. But I refuse to accept that it is impossible to introduce more of these things where your actions influence the world. I'm sure some game could be designed with this feature in mind.

As has been discussed, this is a limitation and an advantage of WoW.  The answers from Blizzard as to why this is hard to do make a lot of sense.  They've created a world with a LOT of backstory.  Expecting people to be able to act in a consistent way while interacting with players in a real-time manner is not realistic.  They'd make a lot of people mad if some person was acting behind the scenes as the king of Ironforge and he forgot an important piece of lore or something.

As for lasting effects on the world, their game got too popular for that to be realistic either.  There's too much effort that goes into designing content.  My server is somewhat of a backwater, but even we have guilds that are clearing BWL and MC with ease.  They would devour any new content the game threw at them, and the people who are lagging behind would never get to see any of it.  I suppose this problem would be self-correcting, since all the people not able to participate in the new content would just quit and you'd just be left with the super hard core folks.  That's not very good from a business standpoint, though.

The only alternative that's had any success so far has been player-vs-player content that's largely player-driven.  There's definitely a market for that, but I don't think mixing the two paradigms is a good idea.

#54 Dark_Archon

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 04:51 PM

View Postsummerlion, on February 6th 2006, 02:42 PM, said:

That's pretty much how *every* computer RPG works though, right?  The graphics just keep getting better.  Wizardry: go into the dungeon and kill things.  When you've killed enough things, go on to the next level dungeon.  << fast forward >> Knights of the Old Republic: kill things.  When you've killed enough things, go on to the next planet.  So I don't think we can blame the problem on World of Warcraft.  As you say, there are millions of subscribers, so this is the game people want.  The only difference between WoW and KOTOR is how many people you're playing with.  In KOTOR, you controlled your whole party.  In WoW, your party is controlled by different people.  So what does WoW offer?  The chance to interact with other people, obviously.  This is the real draw of WoW for people like me.

The most important aspect of an RPG is the storyline. What KOTOR has is a storyline that gets players involved in the game. A MMORPG with a dynamic, growing world and a rich storyline foundation that was built off of by players where the history was allowed to develop and be created by the players would be awesome. The problem is for this to work, you would need live Game Masters, and people involved in the RP aspect, not just the grind. This kind of game probably wouldn't appeal to most of the people who play WoW.

I don't really think WoW is a good start. The game is too focused on the grind aspect, the world is fairly static, and like with most Blizzard games, the community is often difficult to put up with.
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#55 Huntn

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 08:42 AM

View PostDark_Archon, on February 6th 2006, 04:51 PM, said:

The most important aspect of an RPG is the storyline. What KOTOR has is a storyline that gets players involved in the game. A MMORPG with a dynamic, growing world and a rich storyline foundation that was built off of by players where the history was allowed to develop and be created by the players would be awesome. The problem is for this to work, you would need live Game Masters, and people involved in the RP aspect, not just the grind. This kind of game probably wouldn't appeal to most of the people who play WoW.

I don't really think WoW is a good start. The game is too focused on the grind aspect, the world is fairly static, and like with most Blizzard games, the community is often difficult to put up with.

Regarding static worlds vs dynamic worlds, the WoW- The Blackwood Corrupted  an outstanding quest really shows the dilemma faced by MMO questing and how difficult it is to create a dynamic world which allows most of the players to enjoy most of the content.

This quest has the player (with help) gather some food stuffs, mixes in some magic water which will clense the furbolgs, and sets it in the middle of the camp so they will eat it.  Once the furbolgs are clensed the satyr who is responsible for the corruption appears to do battle and of course must be slayed. :)

You can see that if this quest only happened once, a kazillion players would have missed out on it. The other side of the coin is that if you come back to Blackwood Village 5 minutes later, the scenario is reset and all is as it was... The only way I can see this kind of change to permanently work would be multiplayer in a RPG game.

-Hunt'n

#56 alldaveallen

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 05:26 PM

I'm just throwing this idea out as a random brainstorm, but can anyone smarter than me figure out a way in which players of an MMORPG could be rewarded for creating quests?  I guess I'm envisioning some sort of in-game WC3-style map editor (with some limits obviously) where maybe "questcrafter" or "Talesmith" was a trade your character could learn (like fishing or safecracking or whatever).  I'm no programmer, and maybe it would just be too much of a logistical nightmare, but it could be worked out logically within the concept of some of the games that are out there...just a thought.

#57 Morrigan

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:28 PM

EVE has something rudimentary. Players can put cargo up for hauling from points A to  B and offer a specific payment. Other players can look at this list of courier missions and move the goods if desired.

Expanding on this for WoW-type games... players who need certain components (engineers, smiths, tailors, etc) could place buy orders for certain goods, animal bits, minerals, whatever. Other players could sell what they make/find to those buyers. This might sound like the auction house, but it wouldn't consist of auctions, just set buy orders that can be filled. It could be available at every inn and would allow local economies to grow around whatever resources are nearby.

#58 waam

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:37 PM

Everybody has a different opinion so there.  Every MMO has great and bad points.

Speaking about online communities though.  I love WOW the game, but I had to go back to EQMac because the community there is 2nd to NONE.

Say what you will about EQ or SOE, but the people there deserve all the love.

#59 Huntn

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Posted 13 February 2006 - 06:52 PM

View Postwaam, on February 8th 2006, 12:37 PM, said:

Everybody has a different opinion so there.  Every MMO has great and bad points.

Speaking about online communities though.  I love WOW the game, but I had to go back to EQMac because the community there is 2nd to NONE.

Say what you will about EQ or SOE, but the people there deserve all the love.

I wonder how many active players EQMac has? Someone told me the server was full of ghost towns.
-Hunt'n

#60 Huntn

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Posted 01 June 2006 - 10:36 AM

bumped